List of Maniraptors (Cenozoic Extinct Birds)

What follows is a list of extinct Cenozoic bird genera. At present, this list does not include extinct species belonging to extant genera, but it is possible that I will include them someday. However, it is very unlikely that I will ever make a list of bird genera known only from extant members, due to both the immense amount of work that would be required and because comprehensive lists of extant birds already exist (e.g.: Taxonomy in Flux, the IOC World Bird List, the Clements Checklist). If you see any errors or omissions, please leave a comment!

For Mesozoic maniraptors, see this list.

Resources I've found particularly helpful in compiling this list include Gerald Mayr's Avian Evolution and Paleogene Fossil Birds, Jirí Mlíkovsky's Cenozoic Birds of the World, Pierce Brodkorb's Catalogue of Fossil Birds, Julian Hume's Extinct Birds, A Dinosaur A Day, and Fred Ruhe's personal compilation of extinct birds. (Special thanks to Fred for providing me with a copy!)

Paleognaths
-Aepyornis (1851): Pleistocene–Holocene (Late Pleistocene–Meghalayan) Madagascar. A large elephant bird, though not as large as Vorombe. Two valid species have been named, A. maximus and A. hildebrandti.
-Amphipelargus (1891): Miocene (Tortonian) Greece. An ergilornithid known from a partial leg bone.
-Anomalopteryx (1852): Pleistocene–Holocene (Gelasian–Meghalayan) New Zealand. Among the smallest known moa. Had a strong bite. Known to have fed on fibrous vegetation.
-Calciavis (2016): Eocene (Ypresian) U.S.A. A lithornithid known from two nearly complete, well-preserved specimens. Likely used continuous flapping flight. Analysis of the melanosomes preserved in its feathers indicates that it may have had iridescent wing, head, and tail feathers and black wing coverts.
-Dinornis (1843): Pleistocene–Holocene (Calabrian–Meghalayan) New Zealand. The largest known moa. Exhibited the largest known sexual size dimorphism among birds, the females being much larger than males. Known to have eaten a variety of vegetation and nested under rocky overhangs. Two species have been named, D. novaezealandiae and D. robustus. At least some feathers of D. robustus likely had a streaked pattern.
-Diogenornis (1983): Eocene (Ypresian) Brazil. Likely a stem-rhea. Had less reduced wings and a narrower bill than extant rheas.
-Emeus (1853): Pleistocene–Holocene (Late Pleistocene–Meghalayan) New Zealand. A moa with very robust hindlimbs. Had an elongated windpipe that it may have used to make resonating calls. Known to have eaten a variety of vegetation.
-Emuarius (1992): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Burdigalian) Australia. Closely related to cassowaries and emus. Two species have been named, E. gidju and E. guljaruba.
-Eogeranoides (1969): Eocene (Ypresian) U.S.A. A geranoidid known from fragmentary hindlimbs. Possibly the same as Paragrus.
-Eogrus (1934): Eocene–Miocene (Lutetian–Serravallian) China, Kazakhstan, and Mongolia. A stem-ostrich known from several specimens, mainly consisting of hindlimb bones. Once thought to have been a gruiform. Four species have been named, E. aeola, E. crudus, E. turanicus, and E. wetmorei. Includes "Progrus".
-Ergilornis (1960): Eocene (Priabonian) Kazakhstan and Mongolia. A stem-ostrich known mainly from hindlimb bones. Like in extant ostriches, the second toe had been entirely lost. Once thought to have been a gruiform.
-Euryapteryx (1874): Pleistocene–Holocene (Gelasian–Meghalayan) New Zealand. A small moa with a relatively weak bite. Had an elongated windpipe that it may have used to make resonating calls. Known to have eaten a variety of vegetation. At least some of its feathers likely had a streaked pattern.
-Galligeranoides (2016): Eocene (Ypresian) France. Known from hindlimb bones. Once thought to have been a geranoidid, but was probably a close relative of Palaeotis.
-Geranodornis (1969): Eocene (Ypresian–Lutetian) U.S.A. A geranoidid known from a partial leg bone.
-Heterorhea (1914): Pliocene (Zanclean) Argentina. A rhea known from a foot that has been lost.
-Hinasuri (1995): Pliocene (Piacenzian) Argentina. A rhea known from robust leg bones.
-Lithornis (1840): Paleocene–Eocene (Selandian–Lutetian) Denmark, U.K., and U.S.A. Known from many specimens, including associated eggs. Six species have been named, L. vulturinus, L. celetius, L. hookeri, L. nasi, L. plebius, and L. promiscuus. Includes "Pediorallus" and "Promusophaga".
-Megalapteryx (1886): Pleistocene–Holocene (Late Pleistocene–Meghalayan) New Zealand. An agile, lightly-built moa with feathered feet. One of the smallest known moa species. Known to have eaten a variety of vegetation. Its eggs were greenish-blue in color. At least some of its feathers likely had a streaked pattern, but others were likely speckled.
-Mullerornis (1894): Pleistocene–Holocene (Late Pleistocene–Meghalayan) Madagascar. The smallest known elephant bird.
-Opisthodactylus (1891): Miocene (Aquitanian–Tortonian) Argentina. A rhea known from hindlimb bones. Three species have been named, O. patagonicus, O. horacioperezi, and O. kirchneri.
-Pachyornis (1891): Pleistocene–Holocene (Gelasian–Meghalayan) New Zealand. A robustly-built moa. Known to have eaten a variety of vegetation. Three species have been named, P. elephantopus, P. australis, and P. geranoides. P. australis may have had a crest of feathers on its head. At least some feathers of P. elephantopus likely had a streaked pattern, but others were likely speckled.
-Pachystruthio (1954): Pliocene–Pleistocene (Piacenzian–Calabrian) Azerbaijan, China, Georgia, and Hungary. A very large paleognath, possibly a stem-ostrich. Once considered part of Struthio. Three species have been named, P. pannonicus, P. dmanisensis, and P. transcaucasicus.
-Palaeophasianus (1913): Eocene (Ypresian–Lutetian) U.S.A. A geranoidid known from hindlimb bones. Once thought to have been a galliform or gruiform, but may actually be a stem-ostrich. Includes "Geranoides".
-Palaeostruthio (1953): Miocene (Tortonian) Bulgaria, Greece, Iran, Kazakhstan, and Ukraine. A large stem-ostrich. Once thought to have been a species of Struthio.
-Palaeotis (1928): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. Had fairly long forelimbs for a flightless paleognath. May have been a stem-ostrich.
-Paracathartes (1979): Eocene (Ypresian) U.S.A. A turkey-sized lithornithid. Known from several specimens, including associated eggs.
-Paragrus (1933): Eocene (Ypresian) U.S.A. A geranoidid known from hindlimb bones. Once thought to have been a species of Gallinuloides. Two species have been named, P. prentici and P. shufeldti.
-Proapteryx (2013): Miocene (Burdigalian) New Zealand. A stem-kiwi that may have been flight capable. Smaller than extant kiwi. Known from a partial leg bone and skull fragment.
-Proergilornis (1960): Eocene (Priabonian) Mongolia. A stem-ostrich known from hindlimb bones. Once thought to have been a species of Ergilornis.
-Pseudocrypturus (1988): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. and U.S.A. A small lithornithid known from several nearly complete specimens.
-Remiornis (1881): Paleocene (Thanetian) France. Known mainly from hindlimb bones.
-Sinoergilornis (2019): Miocene (Messinian) China. An ergilornithid known from a partial foot.
-Sonogrus (1981): Eocene (Priabonian) Mongolia. An eogruid known from hindlimb bones.
-Urmiornis (1925): Miocene–Pliocene (Langhian–Zanclean) Iran, Kazakhstan, Moldova, Mongolia, Russia, and Ukraine. An ergilornithid known from hindlimb bones and a fragmentary vertebra. Possibly the same as Amphipelargus. Five valid species have been named, U. maraghanus, U. brodkorbi, U. dzabghanensis, U. orientalis, and U. ukrainus.
-Vorombe (2018): Pleistocene–Holocene (Late Pleistocene–Meghalayan) Madagascar. The largest known elephant bird and the largest known paravian overall. Formerly considered to have been the same as Aepyornis.

Anseriforms
-Afrocygnus (2005): Miocene (Messinian) Chad and Libya. One of the few swans known from Africa.
-Aldabranas (1978): Pleistocene (Chibanian–Late Pleistocene) Seychelles. A duck known from limb bones.
-Anabernicula (1935): Miocene–Pleistocene (Messinian–Late Pleistocene) U.S.A. Possibly a shelduck. Four species have been named, A. gracilenta, A. minuscula, A. oregonensis, and A. robusta.
-Anatalavis (1987): Late Cretaceous?–Eocene (Maastrichtian?–Ypresian) U.K. and U.S.A. An early anseriform. Has been suggested to have been a stem-magpie-goose, but may have been more closely related to Conflicto. Two species have been named, A. oxfordi and A. rex, the latter of which was once thought to have been a species of Telmatornis.
-Ankonetta (2010): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Argentina. Known from a partial foot.
-Anserobranta (1972): Miocene (Aquitanian–Tortonian) Czech Republic, France, Germany, and Moldova. Possibly a shelduck.
-Australotadorna (2009): Oligocene (Chattian) Australia. A large shelduck.
-Awengkere (2017): Miocene (Tortonian–Messinian) Australia. A large diving duck, possibly a stiff-tailed duck.
-Balcanas (1998): Pliocene (Zanclean) Bulgaria. May have belonged to the extant genus Tadorna.
-Bambolinetta (2014): Miocene (Tortonian–Messinian) Italy. Possibly a wing-propelled diver, unusually among anseriforms. Once thought to have been a species of Anas.
-Bonibernicla (1985): Miocene (Messinian) Mongolia and U.S.A. A goose known mostly from forelimb bones.
-Brantadorna (1963): Pleistocene (Calabrian) U.S.A. Possibly a shelduck.
-Bumbalavis (2021): Eocene (Ypresian) Mongolia. A small presbyornithid known from forelimb bones.
-Camptorhynchus (1838): Holocene (Meghalayan) Canada and U.S.A. A diving duck with large flaps on either side of its bill, suggesting a specialized diet. Despite having survived into historical times, the causes of its extinction are poorly understood.
-Cayaoa (1979): Miocene (Aquitanian) Argentina. A flightless diving anatid, possibly closely related to stiff-tailed ducks.
-Centrornis (1897): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) Madagascar. A large sheldgoose. Had spurs on its wrists, likely used for fighting.
-Chaunoides (1999): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Aquitanian) Brazil. A screamer known from a few isolated bones.
-Chelychelynechen (1991): Holocene (Northgrippian) U.S.A. (Hawaii). A moa-nalo with very short, deep jaws.
-Chendytes (1925): Pleistocene–Holocene (Calabrian?–Meghalayan) U.S.A. A flightless diving duck. More closely related to dabbling ducks than to modern diving ducks.
-Chenoanas (2012): Miocene (Burdigalian–Tortonian) Austria, China, France, Mongolia, and Russia. A widespread, fairly generalized dabbling anatid. Three species have been named, C. deserta, C. asiatica, and C. sansaniensis.
-Cnemiornis (1866): Pleistocene–Holocene (Late Pleistocene–Meghalayan) New Zealand. A large flightless goose. Two species have been named, C. calcitrans and C. gracilis.
-Conflicto (2019): Paleocene (Danian) Antarctica. A stem-anseriform with long legs and a flat bill. Known from a partial skeleton.
-Cousteauvia (2020): Eocene (Priabonian) Kazakhstan. A diving anseriform known from a partial foot.
-Cygnavus (1931): Oligocene–Miocene (Rupelian–Aquitanian) Germany and Kazakhstan. Possibly a swan. Two species have been named, C. senckenbergi and C. formosus.
-Cygnopterus (1931): Oligocene–Miocene (Rupelian–Serravallian) Belgium, France, and Hungary. Known from several fragmentary specimens. Three valid species have been named, C. affinis, C. alphonsi, and C. neogradensis.
-Dendrochen (1944): Miocene (Burdigalian) U.S.A. Was described as a whistling duck, but may have been more closely related to stiff-tailed ducks.
-Dunstanetta (2007): Miocene (Burdigalian) New Zealand. Possibly closely related to stiff-tailed ducks.
-Eoanseranas (2009): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Burdigalian) Australia. A stem-magpie-goose known from shoulder bones.
-Eoneornis (1895): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Argentina. Known from a partial arm bone. Has been suggested to have been a screamer, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Eremochen (1961): Miocene (Tortonian) U.S.A. Known only from fragmentary arm bones. Possibly a goose.
-Eutelornis (1895): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Argentina. Known from partial limb bones.
-Garganornis (2014): Miocene (Tortonian–Messinian) Italy. A large, flightless anatid. Had knobs on its wrists, likely used for fighting.
-Helonetta (1992): Pleistocene (Gelasian) U.S.A. Known from an arm bone. Possibly closely related to pygmy geese.
-Heteroanser (2012): Miocene (Messinian) Mongolia. A goose known from a partial foot.
-Heterochen (1970): Miocene (Serravallian) U.S.A. Known from a foot.
-Lavadytis (2016): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) U.S.A. A stiff-tailed duck known from several individuals preserved together, possibly representing a breeding colony.
-Limicolavis (1915): Miocene (Aquitanian–Burdigalian) U.S.A. Known from hindlimb bones. Once thought to have been a charadriiform.
-Loxornis (1895): Oligocene (Chattian) Argentina. Known from a partial leg bone that has been lost. Possibly a screamer.
-Manuherikia (2007): Miocene (Burdigalian) New Zealand. Similar to and probably closely related to stiff-tailed ducks. Three species have been named, M. lacustrina, M. douglasi, M. minuta, and M. primadividua.
-Matanas (2007): Miocene (Burdigalian) New Zealand. Possibly closely related to the maned duck.
-Megalodytes (1992): Miocene (Langhian) U.S.A. A diving anseriform. Was described as a swan, but this has been disputed. More complete remains from Japan may not actually belong to this genus.
-Mionetta (1988): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Serravallian) Czech Republic, France, Germany, and Namibia. Possibly closely related to stiff-tailed ducks, but not a specialized diver. Two valid species have been named, M. blanchardi and M. consobrina.
-Mioquerquedula (2012): Miocene (Burdigalian–Tortonian) France, Germany, Hungary, Mongolia, and Romania. A small dabbling anatid. Two species have been named, M. minutissima and M. velox.
-Miotadorna (2007): Miocene (Burdigalian) New Zealand. A shelduck known from arm bones.
-Nannonetta (1979): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) Peru. Possibly a shelduck.
-Naranbulagornis (2019): Paleocene (Thanetian) Mongolia. A large, swan-sized anseriform.
-Nogusunna (2011): Miocene (Serravallian–Tortonian) Germany and Mongolia. A small diving duck, known from partial arm bones.
-Palaeopapia (1979): Eocene–Oligocene (Priabonian–Rupelian) U.K. Known only from fragmentary remains. Was initially named "Howardia", but that name had already been used for a bug. Two species have been named, P. eous and P. hamsteadiensis.
-Paracygnopterus (1979): Oligocene (Rupelian) U.K. Probably a close relative of Romainvillia.
-Paracygnus (1969): Pliocene (Zanclean) U.S.A. Known from a shoulder bone. Possibly a swan.
-Paranyroca (1939): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Burdigalian) France and U.S.A. A swan-sized anseriform known from feet.
-Petropluvialis (1976): Eocene (Priabonian) U.K. Known from shoulder bones. Once thought to have been a dikkop.
-Pinpanetta (2009): Oligocene (Chattian) Australia. Possibly a stiff-tailed duck, likely a specialized diver like extant forms. Three species have been named, P. tedfordi, P. fromensis, and P. vickersrichae.
-Pleistoanser (2006): Pleistocene (Gelasian–Calabrian) Argentina. Possibly a shelduck.
-Presbychen (1930): Miocene (Langhian) U.S.A. Possibly a goose.
-Presbyornis (1926): Paleocene–Eocene (Thanetian–Ypresian) Mongolia and U.S.A. A long-legged anseriform, known from numerous fossils. Three valid species have been named, P. pervetus, P. isoni, and P. recurvirostrus. Includes "Nautilornis".
-Proanser (1979): Miocene (Tortonian–Messinian) Ukraine. Known from partial forelimb bones.
-Protomelanitta (2011): Miocene (Serravallian–Tortonian) Mongolia and U.S.A. A small diving duck, possibly closely related to mergansers. Two species have been named, P. gracilis and P. bakeri.
-Ptaiochen (1991): Holocene (exact age unknown) U.S.A. (Hawaii). A moa-nalo that lived at higher altitudes and had shorter, deeper jaws than Thambetochen.
-Romainvillia (1927): Eocene–Oligocene (Priabonian–Rupelian) Belgium, France, and Kazakhstan. One of the earliest known anatid-like anseriforms. Two species have been named, R. stehlini and R. kazakhstanensis.
-Saintandrea (2013): Oligocene (Chattian) France. A goose-sized stem-anatid, closely related to Romainvillia.
-Sharganetta (2011): Miocene (Serravallian–Tortonian) Mongolia. A diving duck known from partial arm bones.
-Shiriyanetta (2015): Pleistocene (Chibanian–Late Pleistocene) Japan. A flightless diving duck.
-Sinanas (1980): Miocene (Burdigalian–Tortonian) China. Known from a nearly complete skeleton but poorly studied.
-Talpanas (2009): Holocene (Northgrippian) U.S.A. (Hawaii). Had very small eyes, but likely a well-developed sense of touch.
-Teleornis (1899): Oligocene (Chattian) Argentina. Known from a partial arm bone.
-Telmabates (1955): Eocene (Ypresian) Argentina. The first presbyornithid described from South America.
-Thambetochen (1976): Pleistocene–Holocene (Chibanian–Meghalayan) U.S.A. (Hawaii). A moa-nalo that lived at lower altitudes than Ptaiochen. Two species have been named, T. chauliodous and T. xanion.
-Tirarinetta (2008): Pliocene (Zanclean) Australia. A stiff-tailed duck known from an arm bone.
-Wasonaka (1966): Pliocene (Zanclean) Mexico. Known from a partial forelimb and wishbone.
-Wilaru (2013): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Aquitanian) Australia. The youngest known presbyornithid. Once thought to have been a dikkop. Probably more terrestrial than other presbyornithids. Had knobs on its wrists, likely used for fighting. Two species have been named, W. tedfordi and W. prideauxi.

Pangalliforms
-Ameripodius (1995): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Aquitanian) Brazil and France. A wide-ranging quercymegapodiid. Two species have been named, A. silvasantosi and A. alexis.
-Archaealectrornis (1992): Oligocene (Rupelian) U.S.A. Known from an arm bone. Possibly the same as Procrax.
-Archaeophasianus (1933): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) U.S.A. Known from partial limb bones.
-Argillipes (1977): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. Known from partial feet. Two species have been named, A. aurorum and A. paralectoris.
-Bantamyx (1982): Miocene (Messinian) Mongolia. A phasianid known from a partial shoulder bone.
-Boreortalis (1954): Miocene (Aquitanian–Serravallian) U.S.A. A cracid known from partial limb bones. Four species have been named, B. laesslei, B. pollicaris, B. tantala, and B. tedfordi.
-Bumbanipodius (2021): Eocene (Ypresian) Mongolia. Known from partial limb bones. Shared some similarities with Argillipes.
-Bumbanortyx (2021): Eocene (Ypresian) Mongolia. A stem-galliform known from partial limb bones.
-Chambiortyx (2013): Eocene (exact age unknown) Tunisia. A small pangalliform known from partial limb bones.
-Chauvireria (1997): Pleistocene (Gelasian) Bulgaria. A phasianid known from numerous specimens. Two species have been named, C. balcanica and C. bulgarica.
-Diangallus (1985): Miocene (Messinian) China. A phasianid known from a partial foot.
-Eurobambusicola (2016): Miocene (Messinian) Hungary. A phasianid known from several limb bones.
-Gallinuloides (1900): Eocene (Ypresian) U.S.A. A stem-galliform known from several well-preserved specimens.
-Garrdimalga (2017): Pleistocene (exact age unknown) Australia. A large megapode. Less specialized for mound-building than many extant megapodes, and thus may have laid its eggs in burrows.
-Gobihierax (1968): Oligocene (Rupelian–Chattian) Mongolia. Known only from a partial arm bone. Once thought to have been an accipitriform, but may have actually been a galliform.
-Latagallina (2017): Pleistocene (Gelasian–Late Pleistocene) Australia. A large megapode with long, powerful wings. Less specialized for mound-building than many extant megapodes, and thus may have laid its eggs in burrows. Two species have been named, L. naracoortensis and L. olsoni, the first of which was once thought to have been a species of Progura.
-Linquornis (1980): Miocene (Burdigalian–Tortonian) China. A large galliform known from a partial skeleton.
-Litoripes (1979): Eocene (Lutetian) U.K. Known from a foot.
-Lophogallus (2010): Miocene (Serravallian–Tortonian) Mongolia. A phasianid known from a partial arm bone.
-Ludiortyx (1964): Eocene (Priabonian) France. Initially described as a member of the extant charadriiform genus Tringa. Possibly a quercymegapodiid.
-Megalocoturnix (2009): Pliocene (Zanclean) Spain. A phasianid known from a partial arm bone.
-Megavitiornis (2000): Holocene (exact age unknown) Fiji. A large, flightless stem-galliform with deep jaws, closely related to Sylviornis.
-Miogallus (1933): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Germany. Known from a partial shoulder bone.
-Miophasianus (1952): Miocene (Burdigalian–Tortonian) Austria, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, and Spain. A large phasianid known from from numerous specimens (mainly limb bones). Two species have been named, M. altus and M. medius.
-Miortyx (1944): Miocene (Burdigalian) U.S.A. An odontophorid known from limb bones. Two species have been named, M. teres and M. aldeni.
-Mioryaba (2016): Miocene (Messinian) Hungary. A phasianid known from a partial shoulder bone and feet.
-Mwalau (2015): Holocene (Meghalayan) Vanuatu. A large megapode. Less specialized for mound-building than many extant megapodes.
-Namaortyx (2011): Eocene (Lutetian) Namibia. Known from a foot.
-Nanortyx (1963): Eocene (Priabonian) Canada. A small pangalliform known from partial limb bones. Was described as an odontophorid, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Neortyx (1961): Pleistocene (Chibanian–Late Pleistocene) U.S.A. An odontophorid known from limb bones.
-Ngawupodius (1999): Oligocene (Chattian) Australia. The oldest known megapode.
-Palaealectoris (1930): Miocene (Aquitanian) U.S.A. Known from partial arm bones.
-Palaeoalectoris (1987): Miocene (Burdigalian) China. Known from partial limb bones.
-Palaeocryptonyx (1892): Miocene–Pleistocene (Serravallian–Calabrian) Austria, Czech Republic, France, Hungary, Italy, Slovakia, and Spain. A phasianid known from numerous specimens (mainly limb bones). Five species have been named, P. donnezani, P. depereti, P. edwardsi, P. grivensis, and P. novaki.
-Palaeonossax (1956): Oligocene (Rupelian) U.S.A. Known from a partial arm bone.
-Palaeortyx (1869): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Messinian) Austria, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Italy, Namibia, and Spain. A phasianid known from numerous specimens spanning a wide range of body sizes. Seven valid species have been named, P. gallica, P. brevipes, P. grivensis, P. joleaudi, P. phasianoides, P. prisca, and P. volans. Includes "Palaeoperdix".
-Panraogallus (2018): Miocene (Messinian) China. Known from a nearly complete skeleton with a partially preserved, elongate windpipe.
-Paraortygoides (2000): Eocene (Ypresian–Lutetian) Germany and U.K. Closely related to Gallinuloides. Two species have been named, P. messelensis and P. radagasti.
-Paraortyx (1908): Eocene–Oligocene (Priabonian–Rupelian) Belgium and France. Known mainly from limb bones. Two species have been named, P. lorteti and P. brancoi.
-Percolinus (1977): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. Known from a partial foot. May have been some other type of bird.
-Pirortyx (1964): Oligocene (Rupelian–Chattian) France and Germany. A paraortygid known from limb bones.
-Plioperdix (1955): Miocene–Pliocene (Tortonian–Piacenzian) Hungary, Moldova, Mongolia, Morocco, Russia, and Ukraine. A phasianid known from many specimens. Three species have been named, P. ponticus, P. africana, and P. hungarica.
-Proagriocharis (1970): Pliocene (Zanclean) U.S.A. A turkey known from limb bones.
-Procrax (1957): Eocene (Priabonian) U.S.A. Known from a partial skeleton. Was described as a cracid, but this has been disputed.
-Progura (1888): Pliocene–Pleistocene (Piacenzian–Chibanian) Australia. The largest known megapode. Less specialized for mound-building than many extant megapodes, and thus may have laid its eggs in burrows. Two species have been named, P. gallinacea and P. campestris. Based on its pygostyle morphology, P. campestris may have had long, elaborate tail feathers. Includes "Chosornis" and "Palaeopelargus".
-Quercymegapodius (1992): Eocene (Bartonian–Priabonian) France. Known from limb bones. Not especially closely related to megapodes, despite its name. Two species have been named, Q. depereti and Q. brodkorbi.
-Rhegminornis (1943): Miocene (Burdigalian) U.S.A. Probably the oldest known turkey.
-Rustaviornis (1972): Miocene (Tortonian) Georgia. A phasianid known from a partial leg bone.
-Schaubortyx (1964): Oligocene (Chattian) France. Known from a partial skeleton. Probably a phasianid.
-Scopelortyx (2015): Eocene? (Bartonian?) Namibia. A paraortygid known from limb bones.
-Shandongornis (1977): Miocene (Burdigalian–Tortonian) China. A nearly complete skeleton is known, though largely preserved as an impression.
-Shanxiornis (2006): Pleistocene (Gelasian) China. A phasianid known from feet.
-Sobniogallus (2014): Oligocene (Rupelian) Poland. Known from a partial skeleton.
-Sylviornis (1980): Holocene (Meghalayan) New Caledonia. A large, flightless stem-galliform with deep jaws and a bony head crest. Once thought to have been a megapode.
-Taoperdix (1869): Oligocene (Chattian) France. A small pangalliform, possibly a paraortygid.
-Taubacrex (1988): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Aquitanian) Brazil. A quercymegapodiid and the earliest known galliform preserved with gizzard stones. Once thought to have been a rail.
-Telecrex (1934): Eocene (Lutetian–Bartonian) China. Known from a leg bone. Has been suggested to have been a guineafowl, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Tologuica (2009): Miocene (Serravallian–Tortonian) Mongolia. A phasianid known from limb bones. Two species have been named, T. aurorae and T. karhui.
-Xorazmortyx (2019): Eocene (Lutetian–Bartonian) Uzbekistan. A paraortygid known from a partial shoulder bone.

Pan-Mirandornitheans
-Adelalopus (2002): Oligocene (Rupelian) Belgium. A large palaelodid. A partial skeleton is known.
-Agnopterus (1867): Eocene–Miocene (Priabonian–Aquitanian) Brazil, France, Kazakhstan, and U.K. A widespread flamingo, but mostly known from fragmentary remains. Four species have been named, A. laurillardi, A. hantoniensis, A. sicki, and A. turgaiensis. Includes "Headonornis".
-Harrisonavis (1978): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Tortonian) Czech Republic, France, and Germany. A stem-flamingo known from numerous specimens. Had a straighter bill than extant flamingos.
-Juncitarsus (1980): Eocene (Ypresian–Lutetian) Germany and U.S.A. A long-legged, straight-billed stem-mirandornithean. Two species have been named, J. gracillimus and J. merkeli.
-Leakeyornis (1983): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Kenya. A flamingo known from several specimens.
-Megapaloelodus (1944): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Tortonian) Argentina, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, and U.S.A. A large, widespread palaelodid. Four species have been named, M. connectens, M. goliath, M. opsigonus, and M. peiranoi.
-Miobaptus (1982): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Czech Republic and Russia. The oldest named definite grebe. Known from arm bones. Two species have been named, M. walteri and M. huzhiricus.
-Palaelodus (1863): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Tortonian) Australia, Brazil, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Mongolia, New Zealand, and Romania. A widespread palaelodid known from numerous specimens. Seven species have been named, P. ambiguus, P. aotearoa, P. crassipes, P. gracilipes, P. kurochkini, P. pledgei, and P. wilsoni. Includes "Probalearica".
-Phoeniconotius (1963): Oligocene (Chattian) Australia. A large flamingo known from a partial foot. May have been less specialized for swimming than extant flamingos.
-Pliolymbus (1967): Pliocene (Piacenzian) U.S.A. A small but robust grebe.
-Thiornis (1922): Miocene (Tortonian) Spain. A grebe known from a nearly complete skeleton lacking a skull. Once thought to have been a rail. May have been closely related to Tachybaptus.
-Xenorhynchopsis (1905): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) Australia. A flamingo known from hindlimb bones. Two species have been named, X. tibialis and X. minor.

Columbimorphs
-Archaeoganga (1992): Eocene or Oligocene (exact age unknown) France. A sandgrouse known from limb bones. Three species have been named, A. pinguis, A. larvatus, and A. validus.
-Arenicolumba (2008): Miocene (Burdigalian) U.S.A. A small pigeon known from numerous specimens. Once thought to have been a species of Columbina, but may have been more closely related to Turtur.
-Bountyphaps (2008): Holocene (Meghalayan) French Polynesia and Pitcairn Islands (Henderson Island). A large, probably weak-flying pigeon.
-Gerandia (1933): Miocene (Aquitanian) France. Once thought to have been a pigeon, but was more likely a sandgrouse. Known from an arm bone.
-Deliaphaps (2017): Miocene (Burdigalian) New Zealand. A pigeon known from limb bones. May have been closely related to the Nicobar pigeon and crowned pigeons.
-Dysmoropelia (1975): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) St. Helena. A large, probably flightless pigeon.
-Ectopistes (1827): Pliocene?–Holocene (Zanclean?–Meghalayan) Canada and U.S.A. A highly gregagrious, abundant, nomadic pigeon. Fed mainly on nuts and fruits. Went extinct in historical times due to habitat loss and overhunting.
-Leptoganga (1993): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Aquitanian) France. A sandgrouse known from limb bones.
-Linxiavis (2020): Miocene (Messinian) China. A sandgrouse known from a partial skeleton. The oldest known sandgrouse from Asia.
-Microgoura (1904): Holocene (Meghalayan) Solomon Islands (Choiseul). A ground-dwelling pigeon with a feather crest on its head.
-Natunaornis (2001): Holocene? (exact age unknown) Fiji. A large flightless pigeon, probably closely related to crowned pigeons. Had knobs on its wrists, likely used for fighting.
-Pezophaps (1848): Holocene (Meghalayan) Rodrigues. A large flightless pigeon. Males were much larger than females. Had knobs on its wrists that were used for fighting.
-Primophaps (2012): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Burdigalian) Australia. A pigeon known from a shoulder bone. Closely related to bronzewing pigeons.
-Raphus (1760): Holocene (Meghalayan) Mauritius. A large flightless pigeon with a robust beak. Likely bred shortly before and molted shortly after Austral summer. Went extinct in historical times, probably due to pressure from invasive species and overhunting.
-Rupephaps (2009): Miocene (Burdigalian) New Zealand. A large fruit dove known from a shoulder bone.
-Tongoenas (2020): Pleistocene–Holocene (Late Pleistocene–Meghalayan) Tonga. A large arboreal pigeon. One of the largest known flying pigeons.

Otidimorphs
-Chambicuculus (2013): Eocene (exact age unknown) Tunisia. Known from limb bones. Possibly a small stem-cuckoo.
-Cursoricoccyx (1984): Miocene (Burdigalian) U.S.A. A ground-dwelling cuckoo known from limb bones.
-Foro (1992): Eocene (Ypresian) U.S.A. Known from a complete skeleton. Probably a stem-turaco. Likely a ground-dwelling bird, unlike extant turacos.
-Gryzaja (1939): Pliocene (Zanclean–Piacenzian) Moldova and Ukraine. A bustard with strange, widened lower leg bones.
-Ioriotis (1981): Pliocene (Piacenzian) Georgia. Known from a partial arm bone. A large, possibly almost flightless bustard.
-Miootis (1979): Miocene (Messinian) Ukraine. A bustard known from forelimb bones.
-Nannococcyx (1975): Holocene (Meghalayan?) St. Helena. A cuckoo known from a partial arm bone.
-Neococcyx (1963): Eocene (Priabonian) Canada. Known from an arm bone. Possibly a stem-cuckoo.
-Pleotis (1982): Pleistocene (Chibanian) China. A bustard known from a breastbone.
-Thomasococcyx (2008): Miocene (Burdigalian) U.S.A. A ground-dwelling cuckoo known from limb bones.
-Veflintornis (1976): Miocene (Burdigalian–Tortonian) France and Kenya. A possible turaco known from forelimb bones. Was initially named "Apopempsis", but that name had already been used for a beetle. Two species have been named, V. meini and V. africanus.

Strisoreans
-Aegialornis (1891): Eocene (Lutetian–Priabonian) France and Germany. Known from many specimens (consisting of limb bones). Probably a stem-apodiform. Four valid species have been named, A. gallicus, A. broweri, A. leehnardti, and A. wetmorei. Includes "Mesogiornis".
-Archaeodromus (2021): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. An archaeotrogonid known from a partial skeleton.
-Archaeotrogon (1892): Eocene–Oligocene (Priabonian–Chattian) France. Possibly a stem-nightjar. Known from numerous specimens, mainly limb bones. Had spurs on its wrists, possibly used for fighting. Once thought to have been a trogon. Four species have been named, A. venustus, A. cayluxensis, A. hoffstetteri, and A. zitteli.
-Argornis (1999): Eocene (Bartonian?) Russia. A stem-hummingbird known from forelimb bones.
-Cypselavus (1908): Eocene–Oligocene (Bartonian–Rupelian) France. Probably a stem-hummingbird. Includes "Palescyvus".
-Cypseloramphus (2016): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. Known from a partial skeleton with preserved feathers. Probably an apodiform.
-Eocypselus (1984): Eocene (Ypresian) Denmark, U.K., and U.S.A. A stem-apodiform known from several specimens. Two species have been named, E. vincenti and E. rowei. Analysis of the melanosomes preserved in the feathers of E. rowei indicates that it may have had iridescent head feathers.
-Euronyctibius (1989): Eocene–Oligocene (Bartonian–Chattian) France. Known from fragmentary remains. Once thought to have been a stem-potoo, but was more likely a stem-oilbird.
-Eurotrochilus (2004): Oligocene (Rupelian) France, Germany, and Poland. A stem-hummingbird known from several specimens, including a complete skeleton with preserved feathers. Very similar to modern hummingbirds. Two species have been named, E. inexpectatus and E. noniewiczi.
-Fluvioviridavis (2001): Eocene (Ypresian) U.S.A. Known from well-preserved specimens. Possibly a stem-frogmouth, but also had similarities to the extant oilbird.
-Hassiavis (1998): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. Probably an archaeotrogonid. Known from several specimens, including some with well-preserved feathers. Had a barred pattern on its tail feathers.
-Jungornis (1988): Eocene–Oligocene (Priabonian–Rupelian) France and Russia. A stem-hummingbird known from forelimb bones. Two species have been named, J. tesselatus and J. geraldmayri.
-Masillapodargus (1999): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. A stem-frogmouth known from several complete specimens.
-Paraprefica (1999): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. A stem-potoo known from several specimens, including some with well-preserved feathers. Two species have been named, P. kelleri and P. major.
-Parargornis (2003): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. A stem-hummingbird with a swift-like skull and feathering similar to that of owlet-nightjars.
-Prefica (1987): Eocene (Ypresian) U.S.A. A stem-oilbird. Smaller than the extant oilbird, but likely had a similar diet of fruit.
-Primapus (1975): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. Known from arm bones. Closely related to Aegialornis.
-Procuculus (1977): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. Known from a partial foot. Was described as a cuckoo, but is more likely a strisorean. Possibly the same as Primapus.
-Procypseloides (1984): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Aquitanian) France. Known from limb bones. Probably a swift.
-Protocypselomorphus (2005): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. A swift-sized strisorean of uncertain affinities.
-Quercypodargus (1989): Eocene (Bartonian) France. A stem-frogmouth known from hindlimb bones.
-Quipollornis (1977): Miocene (Burdigalian–Serravallian) Australia. A stem-owlet-nightjar known from a partial skeleton.
-Scaniacypselus (1984): Eocene (Ypresian–Priabonian) Denmark, France, and Germany. A stem-swift known from several well-preserved specimens. Two species have been named, S. wardi and S. szarskii. Analysis of the melanosomes preserved in the feathers of S. szarskii indicates that it may have had gray and brown plumage.
-Ventivorus (1988): Eocene (Bartonian) France. Known from partial shoulder bones. Possibly a nightjar.

Gruiforms
-Aletornis (1872): Eocene (Ypresian–Lutetian) U.S.A. Known only from fragmentary remains. Three valid species have been named, A. nobilis, A. marshi, and A. pernix.
-Amitabha (2003): Eocene (Ypresian–Lutetian) U.S.A. Was described as a galliform, but is more likely a rail.
-Aramornis (1926): Miocene (Burdigalian) U.S.A. Known from a partial foot. Once thought to have been a limpkin, but was more likely a crane.
-Aphanapteryx (1868): Holocene (Meghalayan) Mauritius. A flightless rail with a long bill. Likely foraged for snails by probing in leaf litter.
-Aphanocrex (1963): Holocene (Meghalayan) St. Helena. A flightless rail that retained relatively large wings.
-Aptornis (1844): Miocene–Holocene (Burdigalian–Meghalayan) New Zealand. A large, flightless gruiform. Three species have been named, A. otidiformis, A. defossor, and A. proasciarostratus.
-Australlus (2011): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Langhian) Australia. A flightless ralloid. Two species have been named, A. disneyi and A. gagensis.
-Badistornis (1940): Oligocene (Rupelian) U.S.A. Known from a foot. Possibly a stem-limpkin.
-Baselrallus (2014): Miocene (Aquitanian) France. A stem-ralloid known from limb bones.
-Belgirallus (2001): Oligocene (Rupelian) Belgium and Germany. A ralloid known from limb bones and a partial skeleton. Two species have been named, B. oligocaenus and B. minutus.
-Bumbanipes (2021): Eocene (Ypresian) Mongolia. Known from a partial foot. May have been specialized for swimming.
-Bumbaniralla (2021): Eocene (Ypresian) Mongolia. Known from partial shoulder bones. Shared some similarities with messelornithids.
-Camusia (2002): Pliocene (Zanclean) Spain (Menorca). A crane known from limb bones.
-Capellirallus (1954): Holocene (exact age unknown) New Zealand. A flightless rail with a long bill.
-Creccoides (1892): Pleistocene (Gelasian?) U.S.A. Known from a partial foot that appears to have been lost. Possibly a rail.
-Crexica (2017): Miocene (Tortonian–Messinian) Russia. A rail known from partial limb bones.
-Diaphorapteryx (1892): Holocene (Meghalayan) New Zealand (Chatham Islands). A large flightless rail.
-Eocrex (1931): Eocene–Oligocene? (Ypresian–Rupelian?) Tajikistan and U.S.A. Known from partial leg bones. Possibly a rail. Two species have been named, E. primus and E. tagusevae.
-Erythromachus (1874): Holocene (Meghalayan) Rodrigues. A flightless rail. Allegedly fed on tortoise eggs.
-Euryonotus (1897): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene?) Argentina. Known from partial arm bones. Possibly a rail. Two species have been named, E. brachypterus and E. argentinus.
-Fulicaletornis (1933): Eocene (Ypresian–Lutetian) U.S.A. Known from partial leg bones. Possibly a rail. Once thought to have been a species of Aletornis.
-Geranopsis (1891): Eocene–Oligocene (Priabonian–Rupelian) U.K. Known from limb bones. Has been suggested to have been a crane, but may have been a parvigruid.
-Hovacrex (1965): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) Madagascar. Often thought to have been a large gallinule, but may have been some other type of rail.
-Ibidopsis (1891): Eocene (Priabonian) U.K. Known from partial limb bones.
-Itardiornis (1995): Eocene–Oligocene (Priabonian–Rupelian) France. A messelornithid known from limb bones.
-Latipons (1979): Eocene (Lutetian) U.K. Known from partial leg bones. Possibly a rail. Two species have been named, L. gardneri and L. robinsoni.
-Litorallus (2018): Miocene (Burdigalian) New Zealand. A flightless rail.
-Messelornis (1988): Paleocene–Eocene (Thanetian–Lutetian) France, Germany, and U.S.A. Known from many well-preserved specimens. Thought to have had a fleshy crest on its head, but this is likely a taphonomic artifact. Known to have eaten fish and seeds. Analysis of the melanosomes preserved in its feathers indicates that it may have had iridescent plumage. Three species have been named, M. cristata, M. nearctica, and M. russelli.
-Miofulica (1933): Miocene (Serravallian–Tortonian) Belgium. Known from a partial leg bone. Possibly a rail.
-Miohypotaenidia (2017): Miocene (Tortonian–Messinian) Russia. A rail known from partial limb bones.
-Mioporphyrula (2015): Miocene (Tortonian) Moldova. A rail known from a partial leg bone. Once thought to have been a species of Palaeoaramides.
-Miorallus (1933): Miocene (Langhian) France. Known from a partial arm bone. Probably a rail.
-Montirallus (1981): Eocene (Priabonian) France. Once thought to have been a curlew. Possibly a rail, but may have been some other type of bird.
-Mundia (2003): Holocene (Meghalayan) Ascension Island. A flightless rail. Once thought to have been closely related to the Inaccessible Island rail.
-Nesotrochis (1918): Pleistocene–Holocene? (exact age unknown) Cuba, Haiti, Puerto Rico, and U.S. Virgin Islands. A large flightless ralloid closely related to flufftails and adzebills. Three species have been named, N. debooyi, N. picapicensis, and N. steganinos.
-Palaeoaramides (1933): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Aquitanian) France. A stem-ralloid known from limb bones. Two valid species have been named, P. christyi and P. eximius.
-Palaeogeranos (2021): Oligocene (Rupelian) France. A possible stem-crane known from a shoulder bone.
-Palaeogrus (1884): Eocene (Lutetian) Italy. Known from a partial leg bone. May have actually been a paleognath. Numerous other specimens have been assigned to this genus, but it is not clear that they were all closely related.
-Palaeorallus (1931): Eocene (Ypresian) U.S.A. Known from leg bones. Possibly a rail. Two valid species have been named, P. troxelli and P. brodkorbi.
-Paraortygometra (1933): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Aquitanian) France. A ralloid known from limb bones. Had some similarities to flufftails.
-Parvigrus (2005): Oligocene (Rupelian) France. Known from a nearly complete skeleton.
-Parvirallus (1979): Eocene (Ypresian–Lutetian) U.K. Known from limb bones. Possibly a rail. Four species have been named, P. gracilis, P. bassetti, P. gassoni, and P. medius.
-Pastushkinia (2013): Pliocene (Zanclean) Mongolia. A rail known from a partial arm bone. Once thought to have been a species of Crex.
-Pellornis (2011): Eocene (Ypresian) Denmark. A messelornithid known from a partial skeleton. Analysis of the melanosomes preserved in its plumage indicates that it may have had brown tail feathers.
-Pleistorallus (1997): Pleistocene (Calabrian) New Zealand. A rail known from leg bones.
-Priscaweka (2018): Miocene (Burdigalian) New Zealand. A small flightless rail known from numerous specimens.
-Quercyrallus (1933): Eocene or Oligocene (exact age unknown) France. Known from a partial arm bone. Possibly a rail.
-Rallicrex (1933): Oligocene–Miocene (Rupelian–Langhian) Hungary and Romania. A rail known from limb bones. Two valid species have been named, R. kolozsvarensis and R. litkensis.
-Rhenanorallus (2010): Miocene (Aquitanian) Germany. A rail known from partial arm bones.
-Rupelrallus (1997): Oligocene (Rupelian) Belgium and Germany. A parvigruid known from a partial skeleton and limb bones. Two species have been named, R. saxoniensis and R. belgicus.
-Songzia (1990): Eocene (Ypresian) China. A messelornithid known from nearly complete skeletons. Two species have been named, S. heidangkouensis and S. acutunguis.
-Tertiariaporphyrula (1972): Miocene (Burdigalian–Tortonian) France and Mongolia. A rail known from limb bones. Once thought to have been the same as Palaeoaramides. Two species have been named, T. beaumonti and T. tugarinovi.
-Vitirallus (2004): Pleistocene–Holocene? (exact age unknown) Fiji. A flightless rail with a very long bill and stout hindlimbs.
-Youngornis (1981): Miocene (Burdigalian–Tortonian) China. A nearly complete skeleton of this rail is known. Two species have been named, Y. gracilis and Y. qiluensis.

Pan-Charadriiforms
-Alcodes (1968): Miocene (Langhian) U.S.A. An auk known from forelimb bones. Possibly a mancalline, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Becassius (2012): Miocene (Aquitanian) France. A glareolid known from numerous specimens (mainly consisting of limb bones). Once thought to have been a scolopacian.
-Boutersemia (2001): Oligocene (Rupelian) Belgium. Known from limb bones. Possibly a glareolid. Two species have been named, B. belgica and B. parvula.
-Cerestenia (2000): Oligocene (Rupelian) France. A stem-buttonquail known from a nearly complete specimen.
-Cherevychnavis (2019): Miocene (Tortonian) Ukraine. A charadriian known from limb bones.
-Chionoides (2016): Oligocene (Chattian) Australia. Known from a shoulder bone. Closely related to sheathbills.
-Divisulcus (2013): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Mexico. A stem-auk known from a partial arm bone. May have been less specialized for wing-propelled swimming than extant auks.
-Elorius (1868): Miocene (Aquitanian) France. A sandpiper known from many specimens (consisting of limb bones). Two species have been named, E. paludicola and E. limosoides.
-Eocliffia (2017): Eocene? (Bartonian?) Namibia. A stem-buttonquail known from limb bones.
-Feducciavis (2011): Miocene (Langhian) U.S.A. A larid with unusually short legs. Known from a partial skeleton. Probably closely related to noddies.
-Gaviota (1941): Miocene (Tortonian–Messinian) U.S.A. A larian known from a partial arm bone.
-Genucrassum (2014): Oligocene (Chattian) France. A stem-dikkop known from limb bones.
-Hakawai (2015): Miocene (Burdigalian) New Zealand. Known from limb bones. Closely related to seedsnipes and the plains-wanderer, but was likely a wading bird.
-Janipes (1987): Oligocene (Rupelian) Egypt. A large jacana known from a partial foot.
-Jiliniornis (2002): Eocene (Lutetian) China. Known from an arm bone.
-Laricola (2002): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Burdigalian) Czech Republic and France. Known from numerous specimens. Closely related to but had longer legs than larids. Five species have been named, L. elegans, L. desnoyersii, L. intermedia, L. robusta, and L. totanoides.
-Mancalla (1901): Pliocene–Pleistocene (Zanclean–Late Pleistocene) Japan, Mexico, and U.S.A. A flightless stem-auk. Four valid species have been named, M. californiensis, M. cedrosensis, M. lucasi, and M. vegrandis.
-Miocepphus (1940): Miocene (Burdigalian–Messinian) U.S.A. Closely related to the little auk. Four species have been named, M. mcclungi, M. blowi, M. bohaskai, and M. mergulellus.
-Mioglareola (1979): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Czech Republic and Germany. A glareolid known from a partial skull and limb bones. Two species have been named, M. gregaria and M. dolnicensis.
-Miomancalla (2011): Miocene–Pliocene (Serravallian–Zanclean) U.S.A. A large mancalline auk. Two species have been named, M. howardae and M. wetmorei.
-Mirolia (2004): Miocene (Serravallian) Germany. A relatively short-billed sandpiper. Possibly closely related to Calidris. Four species have been named, M. brevirostrata, M. dubia, M. mascalidris, and M. parvula.
-Nahmavis (2020): Eocene (Ypresian) U.S.A. A possible stem-charadriiform known from a partial skeleton with preserved feathers. May have been a gruiform.
-Neilus (2016): Miocene (Burdigalian) New Zealand. Known from limb bones. Closely related to sheathbills.
-Nuntius (1979): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) Peru. A sandpiper known from a shoulder bone.
-Nupharanassa (1987): Oligocene–Miocene (Rupelian–Langhian) Egypt and Kenya. The largest known jacana. Known from partial feet. Three species have been named, N. bulotorum, N. mabokoensis, and N. tolutaria.
-Oligonomus (2015): Oligocene (Chattian) Australia. Known from a partial shoulder bone. Closely related to the plains-wanderer.
-Paractiornis (1930): Miocene (Aquitanian) U.S.A. Known from a foot. Was described as an oystercatcher, but was probably a glareolid.
-Paractitis (1963): Eocene (Priabonian) Canada. Known from a partial shoulder bone. Possibly a scolopacian.
-Parvelorius (2012): Miocene (Aquitanian) France. A small sandpiper known from limb bones. Two species have been named, P. gracilis and P. calidris.
-Pinguinus (1791): Pliocene–Holocene (Zanclean–Meghalayan) Canada, Faroe Islands, France, Gibraltar, Greenland, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Madeira, Morocco, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, U.K., and U.S.A. A large flightless auk. Two species have been named, P. impennis and P. alfrednewtoni. P. impennis went extinct in historical times due to overhunting.
-Praemancalla (1966): Miocene (exact age unknown) U.S.A. A mancalline auk known from fragmentary remains.
-Pseudocepphus (2009): Miocene (Langhian–Tortonian) U.S.A. An auk known from an arm bone. Was thought to have been a possible close relative of alcins, but may have been more closely related to Cepphus after all.
-Pseudosterna (1897): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) Argentina. A possible larid known from partial arm bones. Two species have been named, P. deneger and P. pampaena.
-Scandiavis (2013): Eocene (Ypresian) Denmark. A possible stem-charadriiform known from a well-preserved partial skeleton. May have been a gruiform.
-Scolopacimilis (2012): Miocene (Aquitanian) France. A scolopacian known from limb bones. Once thought to have been a species of Tringa.
-Sternalara (2011): Oligocene?–Miocene (Chattian?–Aquitanian) France. Known from limb bones. Closely related to larids. Two species have been named, S. minuta and S. milneedwardsi.
-Turnipax (2000): Oligocene (Rupelian) France and Germany. A stem-buttonquail known from partial skeletons. Retained a small first toe. Two species have been named, T. dissipata and T. oechslerorum.
-Viator (1979): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) Peru. A lapwing known from a shoulder bone.

Natatoreans
-Actiornis (1891): Eocene (Priabonian) U.K. A possible ibis known from a partial arm bone.
-Aldiomedes (2019): Pliocene (Piacenzian) New Zealand. A small albatross known from a skull.
-Anthropodyptes (1959): Miocene (Aquitanian–Burdigalian) Australia. A large penguin known from an arm bone.
-Anthropornis (1905): Eocene (Ypresian?–Priabonian) Antarctica. A giant stem-penguin. Two species have been named, A. nordenskjoeldi and A. grandis. Includes "Orthopteryx" and "Pachypteryx".
-Aprosdokitos (2017): Eocene (Priabonian) Antarctica. A small stem-penguin known from an arm bone.
-Apteribis (1976): Holocene (exact age unknown) U.S.A. (Hawaii). A flightless ibis. Likely had brown feathers. Two species have been named, A. glenos and A. brevis.
-Archaeospheniscus (1952): Oligocene (Chattian) New Zealand. A stem-penguin known from partial skeletons. Two valid species have been named, A. lowei and A. lopdellorum.
-Ardeagrandis (1972): Miocene (Tortonian) Moldova. A large heron known from a partial foot.
-Argyrodyptes (1905): Oligocene (Rupelian) Argentina. A petrel known from leg bones.
-Arthrodytes (1905): Oligocene (Rupelian) Argentina. A stem-penguin known from limb bones.
-Bimbisula (2013): Pliocene (Zanclean) U.S.A. A booby known from a partial skeleton and a partial skull.
-Borvocarbo (2004): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Burdigalian) France and Germany. A cormorant known from fragmentary specimens. Two valid species have been named, B. guilloti and B. tardatus.
-Colymbiculus (2011): Eocene (Lutetian) Ukraine. The oldest known definite stem-loon. Smaller than extant loons.
-Colymboides (1867): Eocene–Miocene (Priabonian–Burdigalian) Belgium, Czech Republic, Germany, France, Kazakhstan, and U.K. A stem-loon known from several specimens, including partial skeletons. Known to have eaten fish. Five species have been named, C. minutus, C. anglicus, C. belgicus, C. harundinea, and C. metzleri. Includes "Megagallinula".
-Copepteryx (1996): Oligocene (Chattian) Japan. The largest plotopterid and one of the largest diving birds known. Two species have been named, C. hexeris and C. titan.
-Crossvallia (2005): Paleocene (Selandian–Thanetian) Antarctica and New Zealand. A large stem-penguin known from a partial skeleton and limb bones. Two species have been named, C. unienwillia and C. waiparensis.
-Dege (1979): Pliocene (Zanclean) South Africa. A penguin known from fragmentary remains.
-Delphinornis (1905): Eocene (Ypresian?–Priabonian) Antarctica. A stem-penguin known from numerous specimens (consisting of limb bones). Three species have been named, D. larseni, D. arctowskii, and D. gracilis. Includes "Ichtyopteryx".
-Diomedavus (2017): Oligocene (Chattian) U.S.A. The oldest known stem-albatross from the North Pacific.
-Duntroonornis (1952): Oligocene (Chattian) New Zealand. A stem-penguin known from limb bones.
-Empeirodytes (2020): Oligocene (exact age unknown) Japan. A plotopterid known from shoulder bones.
-Eopelecanus (2021): Eocene (Priabonian) Egypt. Known from a leg bone. The oldest known stem-pelican.
-Eopuffinus (1986): Paleocene (Thanetian) Kazakhstan. A possible procellariiform known from a skull fragment.
-Eostega (1929): Eocene (Lutetian) Romania. A suliform known from a partial jaw.
-Eretiscus (1986): Miocene (Aquitanian–Burdigalian) Argentina. One of the smallest known penguins. Was initially named "Microdytes", but that name had already been used for a beetle.
-Gaviella (1940): Oligocene? (exact age unknown) U.S.A. A possible loon known from a partial wing bone.
-Gerandibis (2013): Miocene (Aquitanian) France. An ibis known from numerous specimens. Once thought to have been a species of Plegadis.
-Giganhinga (2002): Miocene–Pleistocene (Tortonian–Calabrian) Argentina and Uruguay. The largest known darter.
-Goliathia (1930): Oligocene (Rupelian) Egypt. A shoebill known from limb bones.
-Grallavis (1984): Miocene (Aquitanian–Burdigalian?) France and Libya. A stork known from most of the skeleton. Possibly closely related to Leptoptilos.
-Heliadornis (1985): Miocene–Pliocene (Langhian–Piacenzian) Austria, Belgium, Slovakia, and U.S.A. The youngest known tropicbird from the North Atlantic. Three species have been named, H. ashbyi, H. minor, and H. paratethydicus.
-Hokkaidornis (2008): Oligocene (Chattian) Japan. A plotopterid known from a partial skeleton.
-Icadyptes (2007): Eocene (Priabonian) Peru. One of the most completely known giant stem-penguins.
-Inguza (1975): Pliocene (Zanclean) South Africa. A penguin known from several specimens.
-Inkayacu (2010): Eocene (Priabonian) Peru. A giant penguin known from a nearly complete skeleton with preserved feathers and scales. Analysis of the melanosomes preserved in its feathers indicates that it may have had gray and reddish brown plumage.
-Kaiika (2011): Eocene (Ypresian) New Zealand. A stem-penguin known from an arm bone.
-Kairuku (2012): Oligocene (Rupelian–Chattian) New Zealand. A giant stem-penguin known from partial skeletons. Three species have been named, K. waitaki, K. grebneffi, and K. waewaeroa.
-Kievornis (1990): Eocene (Lutetian–Bartonian) Ukraine. Possibly a procellariiform.
-Klallamornis (2016): Eocene?–Oligocene (Priabonian?–Chattian?) U.S.A. The largest known North American plotopterid. Three species have been named, K. abyssa, K. buchanani, and K. clarki.
-Korora (1952): Oligocene (Chattian) New Zealand. A penguin known from a foot.
-Kumimanu (2017): Paleocene (Selandian–Thanetian) New Zealand. One of the earliest known stem-penguins to evolve giant body size.
-Kupoupou (2019): Paleocene (Danian–Selandian) New Zealand (Chatham Islands). A stem-penguin known from several partial skeletons. One of the earliest known stem-penguins with short, stout feet similar to those of modern penguins.
-Limicorallus (1968): Oligocene (Chattian) Kazakhstan. A small cormorant. Once thought to have been a rail.
-Limnofregata (1977): Eocene (Ypresian) U.S.A. A stem-frigatebird known from several specimens, including nearly complete skeletons preserved with feathers. Likely had forked tail feathers, similar to extant frigatebirds. Three species have been named, L. azygosternon, L. hasegawai, and L. hutchisoni.
-Lithoptila (2005): Paleocene–Eocene (Thanetian–Ypresian) Morocco. A stem-tropicbird known from numerous specimens, including limb bones and a partial skull. The oldest known neornithean from Africa.
-Macranhinga (1992): Miocene–Pliocene (Langhian–Zanclean) Argentina, Brazil, and Peru. A large darter. May have hunted by pursuit-diving instead of stalking like extant darters. Three species have been named, M. paranensis, M. ameghinoi, and M. ranzii. At least M. ranzii was likely flightless.
-Madrynornis (2007): Miocene (Tortonian) Argentina. Probably one of the oldest known crown-penguins.
-Makahala (2015): Eocene or Oligocene (exact age unknown) U.S.A. A procellariiform known from forelimb bones.
-Mangystania (2015): Eocene (Bartonian) Kazakhstan. A possible suliform known from a partial arm bone.
-Marambiornis (2002): Eocene (Bartonian–Priabonian) Antarctica. A stem-penguin known from limb bones.
-Marambiornopsis (2021): Eocene (Priabonian) Antarctica. A stem-penguin known from a foot bone.
-Marplesornis (1972): Miocene–Pliocene? (exact age unknown) New Zealand. A stem-penguin known from a partial skeleton. Closely related to crown-penguins.
-Masillastega (2002): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. A possible stem-booby known from a skull.
-Matuku (2010): Miocene (Burdigalian) New Zealand. A heron known from limb bones and skull fragments.
-Meganhinga (1995): Miocene (Burdigalian–Serravallian) Chile. A large, flightless darter.
-Mesetaornis (2002): Eocene (Bartonian–Priabonian) Antarctica. A stem-penguin known from limb bones.
-Microsula (1938): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Austria, France, Japan, and U.S.A. A small booby. May have belonged to the extant genus Morus. Two species have been named, M. avita and M. pygmaea. Includes "Enkurosula".
-Miopelecanus (1984): Miocene (Aquitanian–Langhian) France and Germany. A pelican known from several specimens, mainly consisting of limb bones. May have belonged to the extant genus Pelecanus. Two species have been named, M. gracilis and M. intermedius.
-Miosula (1925): Miocene–Pliocene (Tortonian–Piacenzian) U.S.A. A booby known from an impression of a skeleton and a partial leg bone. Two species have been named, M. media and M. recentior.
-Mopsitta (2008): Eocene (Ypresian) Denmark. Was described as a parrot, but is more likely an ibis, and probably a species of Rhynchaeites.
-Muriwaimanu (2018): Paleocene (Selandian) New Zealand. A stem-penguin known from a partial skeleton. Once thought to have been a species of Waimanu.
-Murunkus (1987): Eocene (Lutetian–Bartonian) Uzbekistan. Known from a wing bone. Possibly an albatross.
-Nambashag (2011): Oligocene (Chattian) Australia. A stem-cormorant known from numerous specimens. Two species have been named, N. billerooensis and N. microglaucus.
-Nectornis (1984): Miocene (Aquitanian–Tortonian?) Czech Republic, France, Germany, Kenya, and Turkey. A stem-cormorant known from numerous specimens. Three species have been named, N. miocaenus, N. africanus, and N. anatolicus.
-Notodyptes (1953): Eocene (Ypresian?–Priabonian) Antarctica. A stem-penguin known from limb bones. Possibly a species of Archaeospheniscus or Delphinornis.
-Notoleptos (2016): Eocene (Priabonian) Antarctica. A very small albatross known from a foot.
-Nucleornis (1979): Pliocene (Zanclean) South Africa. A penguin known from fragmentary remains.
-Nyctisoma (2015): Miocene (Serravallian–Tortonian) Mongolia. A heron known from a skull fragment.
-Oligocorax (1952): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Burdigalian) Czech Republic, France, and Germany. A stem-cormorant known from several specimens, including nearly complete skeletons. Two species have been named, O. littoralis and O. stoeffelensis.
-Olympidytes (2016): Eocene or Oligocene (exact age unknown) U.S.A. A small plotopterid known from a partial skeleton.
-Pachydyptes (1930): Eocene (Priabonian) New Zealand. A giant stem-penguin known from limb bones.
-Palaeeudyptes (1859): Eocene–Oligocene (Ypresian?–Rupelian) Antarctica, Argentina, Chile, and New Zealand. The largest known penguin. Four species have been named, P. antarcticus, P. gunnari, P. klekowskii, and P. marplesi.
-Palaeoephippiorhynchus (1930): Oligocene (Rupelian) Egypt. A stork known from a partial skull and possibly other bones.
-Palaeospheniscus (1891): Miocene (Aquitanian–Tortonian) Argentina and Peru. One of the youngest known stem-penguins. Three valid species have been named, P. patagonicus, P. bergi, and P. biloculata.
-Paleosula (1958): Miocene (Serravallian–Tortonian) U.S.A. A booby that may have used wing-propelled diving.
-Paludiavis (1982): Miocene (Tortonian–Messinian) Pakistan and Tunisia. A shoebill known from feet.
-Paraptenodytes (1891): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Aquitanian) Argentina. A stem-penguin known from several specimens. Three species have been named, P. antarcticus, P. brodkorbi, and P. robustus.
-Pelargosteon (1962): Pleistocene (Gelasian–Chibanian) Germany, Hungary, and Romania. A large stork.
-Perudyptes (2007): Eocene (Lutetian) Peru. A large stem-penguin known from a partial skeleton.
-Petralca (1987): Miocene (Aquitanian) Austria. Known from a partial skeleton. Was thought to have been an auk, but was actually a stem-loon.
-Phaethusavis (2008): Eocene (Ypresian) Morocco. A stem-tropicbird known from a partial arm bone.
-Phocavis (1988): Eocene (Priabonian) U.S.A. The oldest known plotoperid. Known from a foot.
-Pikaihao (2013): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Kenya and New Zealand. A bittern known from limb bones and a skull fragment.
-Piscator (1976): Eocene (Priabonian) U.K. Known from a partial beak. Possibly a cormorant.
-Platydyptes (1952): Oligocene (Chattian) New Zealand. A stem-penguin known from several specimens, including partial skeletons. Three species have been named, P. novaezealandiae, P. amiesi, and P. marplesi.
-Plotopterum (1969): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Burdigalian) Japan and U.S.A. A small plotopterid known from limb bones.
-Plotornis (1874): Miocene (Aquitanian–Burdigalian) France and Italy. A small albatross. Two valid species have been named, P. delfortrii and P. graculoides. Includes "Chenornis".
-Proardea (1933): Eocene?–Oligocene (Priabonian?–Rupelian) Belgium and France. One of the oldest known herons. Two species have been named, P. amissa and P. deschutteri.
-Proardeola (1979): Miocene (Aquitanian) France. A heron known from a foot and shoulder bones.
-Prophaethon (1899): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. A stem-tropicbird known from several specimens, including partial skeletons. Includes "Proplegadis".
-Protibis (1891): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Argentina. Known from a partial leg bone. Possibly an ibis.
-Protoplotus (1931): Eocene? (exact age unknown) Indonesia (Sumatra). An early suliform known from a nearly complete skeleton. Unusually for a suliform, it has been found with a large number of gizzard stones.
-Pseudaptenodytes (1970): Miocene–Pliocene (Tortonian–Zanclean) Australia. A penguin known from forelimb bones.
-Pterodromoides (2001): Pliocene (Zanclean) Spain (Menorca) and U.S.A. A petrel known from several specimens, including a partial skull.
-Ramphastosula (2004): Miocene (Messinian) Peru. A booby with an unusual, toucan-like beak. Two species have been named, R. ramirezi and R. aguirrei.
-Rhynchaeites (1898): Eocene (Ypresian–Lutetian) Denmark and Germany. A stem-ibis known from numerous specimens. Had shorter legs and may have been less specialized for tactile foraging than extant ibises. Once thought to have been a charadriiform.
-Rupelornis (1871): Oligocene (Rupelian) Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Iran, and Poland. A long-legged procellariiform with flattened toes. Four species have been named, R. definitus, R. babaheydariensis, R. brodkorbi, and R. harmati. Includes "Diomedeoides" and "Frigidafons".
-Sarmatosula (1977): Miocene (Serravallian–Tortonian) Romania. A booby known from limb bones.
-Sequiwaimanu (2018): Paleocene (Selandian) New Zealand. A stem-penguin known from a partial skeleton.
-Stemec (2015): Oligocene (Chattian) Canada. A possible plotopterid known from a shoulder bone. May have been some other type of suliform.
-Stenornis (2020): Oligocene (Rupelian) Japan. A large plotopterid known from shoulder bones.
-Taphophoyx (2019): Miocene (Messinian) U.S.A. A heron known from shoulder bones.
-Tonsala (1980): Oligocene (Chattian?) U.S.A. A plotopterid known from several specimens, including partial skeletons.
-Tydea (2012): Oligocene (Rupelian) Belgium. A stem-albatross known from forelimb bones.
-Vadaravis (2013): Eocene (Ypresian) U.S.A. A possible stem-ibis known from a partial skeleton.
-Valenticarbo (1979): Pliocene? (Piacenzian?) India. A possible cormorant named based on a cast of a partial foot. The original specimen has been lost, if it ever existed at all.
-Waimanu (2006): Paleocene (Selandian) New Zealand. Known from a partial skeleton. One of the oldest known stem-penguins.
-Xenerodiops (1987): Oligocene (Rupelian) Egypt. Known from a partial beak and an arm bone. Likely had a strong bite. Had some similarities to herons.
-Xenicibis (1977): Holocene (exact age unknown) Jamaica. A flightless ibis. Had unusually robust forelimbs, likely used for fighting.
-Zeltornis (1981): Miocene (Burdigalian?) Libya. A large heron known from a partial shoulder bone.
-Zhylgaia (1988): Paleocene (Thanetian) Kazakhstan. A stem-tropicbird known from fragmentary limb bones. Includes "Tshulia".

Accipitrimorphs
-Aiolornis (1999): Pliocene–Pleistocene (Piacenzian–Calabrian) U.S.A. Once thought to have been a species of Teratornis.
-Aizenogyps (1998): Pliocene (Piacenzian) U.S.A. A cathartid known from limb bones and vertebrae.
-Amanuensis (2003): Miocene (Burdigalian) Namibia. The oldest known stem-secretarybird from Africa.
-Anchigyps (2012): Miocene (Serravallian–Tortonian) U.S.A. A gypaetine known from a partial skeleton and a foot.
-Apatosagittarius (1989): Miocene (Serravallian–Tortonian) U.S.A. A long-legged accipitrid.
-Aquilavus (1933): Miocene (Aquitanian) France. An accipitrid known from a foot. Numerous other specimens have been assigned to this genus, but it is not clear that they were all closely related.
-Archaehierax (2021): Oligocene (Chattian) Australia. A large accipitrid known from a partial skeleton. Had relatively short wings, likely as an adaptation for hunting in forested habitats.
-Arikarornis (1966): Miocene (Aquitanian) U.S.A. Known from a partial leg bone. Probably a gypaetine.
-Argentavis (1980): Miocene–Pliocene (Tortonian–Zanclean) Argentina. A giant teratornithid and the most massive flying bird known.
-Aviraptor (2020): Oligocene (Rupelian) Poland. A small, long-legged accipitrid known from a nearly complete skeleton.
-Brasilogyps (1985): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Aquitanian) Brazil. A cathartid known from hindlimb bones.
-Breagyps (1938): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) U.S.A. A cathartid known from several specimens.
-Bermuteo (2008): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) Bermuda. An accipitrid known from limb bones.
-Cathartornis (1910): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) U.S.A. A teratornithid known from limb bones.
-Diatropornis (1899): Eocene (Bartonian–Priabonian) France. A possible stem-cathartid known from limb bones. Was initially named "Tapinopus", but that name had already been used for a cricket.
-Dryornis (1891): Pliocene (Zanclean–Piacenzian) Argentina. A cathartid known from limb bones. The largest known cathartid. Once thought to have been a phorusrhacid.
-Gansugyps (2010): Miocene (Messinian) China. A stem-aegypiine known from nearly complete skeletons.
-Garganoaetus (1973): Pliocene (Zanclean) Italy. A large accipitrid. Two species have been named, G. freudenthali and G. murivorus.
-Geronogyps (1979): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) Argentina and Peru. A cathartid known from limb bones.
-Gigantohierax (2002): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene?) Cuba and Dominican Republic. A giant accipitrid. Two species have been named, G. suarezi and G. itchei.
-Hadrogyps (1988): Miocene (Langhian–Serravallian) U.S.A. A robust cathartid known from a foot.
-Horusornis (1991): Eocene (Priabonian) France. A raptorial bird of uncertain affinities, possibly an early accipitriform. May have had a highly flexible ankle joint.
-Kuntur (2015): Miocene (Tortonian?) Peru. A cathartid known from a partial foot.
-Milvoides (1979): Eocene (Lutetian) U.K. A possible accipitrid known from a partial foot.
-Mioaegypius (1984): Miocene (Burdigalian) China. Known from a large foot. Was described as an aegypiine, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Miohierax (1944): Miocene (Aquitanian) U.S.A. An accipitrid known from a partial foot.
-Mioneophron (2016): Miocene (Messinian) China. A gypaetine known from a nearly complete skeleton.
-Necrastur (1892): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) Australia. An accipitrid known from an arm bone.
-Neogyps (1916): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) Mexico and U.S.A. A gypaetine known from several specimens.
-Neophrontops (1916): Miocene–Pleistocene (Burdigalian–Late Pleistocene) U.S.A. A gypaetine known from several specimens, including partial skeletons. Similar to the Egyptian vulture. Six species have been named, N. americanus, N. dakotensis, N. ricardoensis, N. slaughteri, N. vallecitoensis, and N. vetustus.
-Oscaravis (2009): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene?) Cuba. Once thought to have been a species of Teratornis.
-Palaeastur (1943): Miocene (Aquitanian) U.S.A. An accipitrid known from a partial foot.
-Palaeoborus (1884): Miocene–Pliocene (Burdigalian–Zanclean) U.S.A. A gypaetine known from several specimens, including a nearly complete skeleton. Three species have been named, P. umbrosus, P. howardae, and P. rosatus.
-Palaeocircus (1871): Eocene (Priabonian) France. An accipitriform known from a wing bone. Has been considered an osprey, but this has been disputed.
-Palaeohierax (1871): Miocene (Aquitanian) France. A possible gypaetine known from a foot.
-Palaeoplancus (1933): Eocene–Oligocene (Priabonian–Rupelian) U.S.A. A possible stem-accipitrid known from a partial skeleton and a foot. Two species have been named, P. sternbergi and P. dammanni.
-Pampagyps (2017): Pleistocene (Chibanian) Argentina. A cathartid known from limb bones.
-Parasarcoramphus (2002): Eocene or Oligocene (exact age unknown) France. A possible stem-cathartid known from a foot.
-Pelargopappus (1885): Oligocene–Miocene (Rupelian–Aquitanian) France. The oldest known stem-secretarybird. Was initially named "Pelargopsis", but that name had already been used for a kingfisher. Two valid species have been named, P. magnus and P. schlosseri. Includes "Amphiserpentarius".
-Pengana (1993): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Burdigalian) Australia. An accipitrid known from a partial leg bone. Likely had a highly flexible ankle joint.
-Perugyps (2005): Miocene (Tortonian–Messinian) Peru. A cathartid known from several specimens.
-Phasmagyps (1927): Eocene (Priabonian) U.S.A. A possible cathartid known from a partial leg bone.
-Pleistovultur (2008): Pleistocene?–Holocene? (Late Pleistocene?–Greenlandian?) Brazil. A cathartid known from a leg bone.
-Pliogyps (1959): Miocene–Pliocene (Tortonian–Piacenzian) U.S.A. A cathartid known from limb bones. Two species have been named, P. fisheri and P. charon.
-Proictinia (1913): Miocene (Tortonian–Messinian) U.S.A. An accipitrid known from a shoulder bone.
-Promilio (1958): Miocene (Aquitanian–Burdigalian) France and U.S.A. An accipitrid known from hindlimb bones. Five species have been named, P. efferus, P. bordkorbi, P. epileus, P. floridanus, and P. incertus.
-Qiluornis (2000): Miocene (Burdigalian–Tortonian) China. A stem-aegypiine known from a partial skeleton.
-Taubatornis (2002): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Aquitanian) Brazil. The oldest known teratornithid.
-Teratornis (1909): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) Mexico and U.S.A. A teratornithid known from numerous specimens. Two species have been named, T. merriami and T. woodburnensis. Includes "Pleistogyps".
-Titanohierax (1937): Pleistocene? (Late Pleistocene?) Bahamas. A large accipitrid.
-Vinchinavis (2020): Miocene (Messinian) Argentina. A large accipitrid known from arm bones.
-Wingegyps (2004): Pleistocene? (Late Pleistocene?) Brazil and Venezuela. A small cathartid.

Strigiforms
-Alasio (1998): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) France. Known from a shoulder bone.
-Asphaltoglaux (2013): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) U.S.A. A small owl known from limb bones.
-Aurorornis (2011): Eocene (Priabonian) Russia. Known from a foot. Was described as a protostrigid, but may have been more closely related to Heterostrix.
-Berruornis (1994): Paleocene (Selandian–Thanetian) France and Germany. A large owl known from limb bones and a partial beak. The oldest known owl from Europe. Two species have been named, B. orbisantiqui and B. halbedeli.
-Eostrix (1971): Eocene (Ypresian) Mongolia, U.K., and U.S.A. A small protostrigid known from hindlimb bones. Five species have been named, E. mimica, E. gulottai, E. martinellii, E. tsaganica, and E. vincenti.
-Grallistrix (1991): Pleistocene–Holocene (Chibanian–Northgrippian) U.S.A. (Hawaii). A long-legged owl. Four species have been named, G. geleches, G. auceps, G. erdmani, and G. orion.
-Heterostrix (2011): Oligocene (Rupelian) Mongolia. A small owl known from a foot. Likely had a highly flexible second toe.
-Intulula (1998): Miocene (Burdigalian) Czech Republic and Germany. Known from limb bones. Two species have been named, I. tinnipara and I. brevis.
-Minerva (1915): Eocene (Ypresian–Bartonian) U.S.A. A protostrigid known from limb bones. Had accipitrid-like talons. Four valid species have been named, M. antiqua, M. californiensis, M. leptosteus, and M. saurodosis. Includes "Protostrix".
-Mioglaux (1998): Miocene (Aquitanian–Burdigalian) Czech Republic and France. Known from limb bones. Two species have been named, M. debellatrix and M. poirrieri.
-Miotyto (2013): Miocene (Langhian) Germany. A tytonid known from limb bones.
-Necrobyas (1892): Eocene–Miocene (Priabonian–Aquitanian) France. Known from limb bones. Possibly a tytonid. Five valid species have been named, N. harpax, N. arvernensis, N. edwardsi, N. medius, and N. rossignoli. Includes "Paratyto".
-Nocturnavis (1987): Eocene (Priabonian) France. Known from arm bones.
-Ogygoptynx (1976): Paleocene (Selandian–Thanetian) U.S.A. Known from a foot. The oldest known owl from North America.
-Oligostrix (1983): Oligocene (Rupelian–Chattian) Germany and Switzerland. A protostrigid known from hindlimb bones. Two species have been named, O. rupelensis and O. bergeri.
-Oraristrix (2010): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) U.S.A. A long-legged owl. Once thought to have been a species of Strix.
-Ornimegalonyx (1958): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) Cuba. A large, possibly flightless owl. Two valid species have been named, O. oteroi and O. ewingi.
-Palaeobyas (1987): Eocene or Oligocene (exact age unknown) France. A large owl known from a foot.
-Palaeoglaux (1987): Eocene (Lutetian–Priabonian) France and Germany. A small owl known from several specimens, including nearly complete skeletons. Two species have been named, P. perrierensis and P. artophoron.
-Palaeotyto (1987): Eocene or Oligocene (exact age unknown) France. A large owl known from a shoulder bone.
-Primoptynx (2020): Eocene (Ypresian) U.S.A. Known from a partial skeleton. Had accipitrid-like talons.
-Prosybris (1970): Oligocene–Miocene (Rupelian–Burdigalian) Austria, Belgium, and France. Similar to Necrobyas. Possibly a tytonid.
-Selenornis (1987): Eocene?–Oligocene (exact age unknown) Belgium and France. Known from hindlimb bones. Two species have been named, S. henrici and S. steendorpensis.
-Sophiornis (1987): Eocene or Oligocene (exact age unknown) France. A large owl known from limb bones.

Coliiforms
-Anneavis (1992): Eocene (Ypresian) U.S.A. A sandcoleid known from several specimens, including a nearly complete skeleton.
-Botauroides (1915): Eocene (Ypresian–Lutetian) U.S.A. A sandcoleid known from a partial foot.
-Celericolius (2010): Eocene (Ypresian) U.S.A. Had long, narrow wings, likely making it an agile flier.
-Chascacocolius (1992): Eocene (Ypresian–Lutetian) Denmark, Germany, and U.S.A. Specialized for gaping, likely as an adaptation for feeding on fruit. Two species have been named, C. oscitans and C. cacicirostris.
-Eobucco (1976): Eocene (Ypresian–Lutetian) U.S.A. A large sandcoleid known from a foot.
-Eoglaucidium (1987): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. A sandcoleid known from numerous specimens, including complete skeletons. Known to have eaten seeds. Once thought to have been an owl.
-Limnatornis (1871): Miocene (Aquitanian) France. Known from limb bones. Possibly the same as Necrornis. Two species have been named, L. paludicola and L. archiaci.
-Masillacolius (1998): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. Had long feet and a forward-pointing first toe. Known to have eaten seeds.
-Necrornis (1871): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Tortonian) Austria, France, and Germany. Known from limb bones.
-Oligocolius (2000): Oligocene (Rupelian–Chattian) Germany. Had a robust, parrot-like skull. Known to have eaten seeds. Two species have been named, O. brevitarsus and O. psittacocephalon.
-Palaeospiza (1878): Eocene (Priabonian) U.S.A. The youngest known stem-mousebird from North America.
-Primocolius (1988): Eocene (Bartonian–Priabonian) France. Known from limb bones. Two species have been named, P. sigei and P. minor.
-Sandcoleus (1992): Paleocene–Eocene (Thanetian–Ypresian) U.S.A. Known from numerous specimens.
-Selmes (1999): Eocene (Lutetian) France and Germany. Known from several specimens. Known to have eaten seeds.
-Tsidiiyazhi (2017): Paleocene (Danian) U.S.A. A sandcoleid known from a partial skeleton. The oldest known telluravian and the oldest known definite neoavian.
-Uintornis (1872): Eocene (Ypresian–Lutetian) U.S.A. A sandcoleid known from feet. Two species have been named, U. lucaris and U. marionae.

Cavitavians
-Australopicus (2012): Pliocene (Zanclean) South Africa. The oldest known woodpecker from Africa.
-Bitumenpicus (2021): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) U.S.A. A small woodpecker known from limb bones.
-Breacopus (2021): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) U.S.A. A large woodpecker known from limb bones.
-Capitonides (1969): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Germany and Russia. A barbet known from limb bones. May have belonged to the extant genus Trachyphonus. Two species have been named, C. europeus and C. protractus.
-Cryptornis (1871): Eocene (Priabonian) France. A coraciian known from a poorly-preserved partial skeleton.
-Eocoracias (2000): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. A coraciian known from several specimens, including complete skeletons. Had short wings similar to those of ground rollers. Known to have eaten seeds. Analysis of the melanosomes preserved in its feathers as well as phylogenetic bracketing indicate that it may have had black and structurally colored plumage.
-Euroceros (2007): Miocene (Tortonian–Messinian) Bulgaria. A ground hornbill known from limb bones.
-Geranopterus (1892): Eocene–Miocene (Priabonian–Burdigalian) Czech Republic and France. A coraciian known from several specimens, representing most of the skeleton. Possibly the same as Cryptornis. Three species have been named, G. alatus, G. bohemicus, and G. milneedwardsi.
-Gracilitarsus (1998): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. Had apodiform-like wings but also long, slender feet. Possibly a stem-piciform.
-Jacamatia (2020): Oligocene (Rupelian) France. Known from a forelimb. Likely a stem-galbulan, possibly closely related to Sylphornis.
-Laputavis (2001): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. Was described as an apodiform, but is more likely a coraciian. Was initially named "Laputa", but that name had already been used for a fish.
-Laurillardia (1871): Eocene–Oligocene (Priabonian–Rupelian) France and Poland. A stem-upupidean known from partial skeletons. Three species have been named, L. longirostris, L. munieri, and L. smoleni.
-Masillatrogon (2009): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. A small stem-trogon known from nearly complete skeletons.
-Messelirrisor (1998): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. A stem-upupidean known from numerous specimens, including complete skeletons preserved with feathers and preen gland oils. The length of the beak appears to have been variable, possibly reflecting sexual dimorphism. Three species have been named, M. parvus, M. grandis, and M. halcyrostris. M. grandis is known to have had a barred pattern on its tail feathers.
-Miocoracias (2013): Miocene (Aquitanian) France. A roller known from limb bones.
-Miopico (1998): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Morocco. A stem-pician known from a partial foot.
-Oligosylphe (2002): Oligocene (Rupelian) Belgium. Known from a partial hindlimb. Closely related to Sylphornis.
-Palaegithalus (1871): Eocene (Priabonian) France. Known from a poorly-preserved partial skeleton. Possibly closely related to Sylphornis. Once thought to have been a passeriform.
-Palaeonerpes (1969): Miocene (Serravallian) U.S.A. A woodpecker known from a partial leg bone.
-Palaeotodus (1976): Eocene–Oligocene (Priabonian–Rupelian) France, Germany, and U.S.A. A stem-tody known from several specimens. Three species have been named, P. emryi, P. escampsiensis, and P. itardiensis.
-Paracoracias (2009): Eocene (Ypresian) U.S.A. A coraciian known from a nearly complete skeleton.
-Paratrogon (1933): Miocene (Aquitanian) France. A trogon known from arm bones.
-Phirriculus (2000): Miocene (Aquitanian–Burdigalian) France and Germany. A possible woodhoopoe known from limb bones.
-Picavus (2012): Oligocene (Rupelian) Czech Republic. A stem-pician known from a partial skeleton.
-Piculoides (2011): Miocene (Aquitanian) France. A woodpecker known from a partial foot.
-Plesiocathartes (1908): Eocene (Ypresian–Lutetian?) France, Germany, U.K., and U.S.A. A stem-courol. Initially thought to have been a cathartid. Five species have been named, P. europaeus, P. geiselensis, P. kelleri, P. major, and P. wyomingensis. P. kelleri is known to have had a barred pattern on its tail feathers.
-Pliopicus (1967): Miocene (Tortonian–Messinian) U.S.A. A woodpecker known from a partial foot.
-Primobucco (1970): Eocene (Ypresian–Lutetian) Germany and U.S.A. A small coraciian known from several specimens, including complete skeletons. Known to have eaten seeds. Three species have been named, P. mcgrewi, P. frugilegus, and P. perneri.
-Primotrogon (1999): Oligocene (Rupelian) France and Germany. A stem-trogon known from several specimens, including nearly complete skeletons. Analysis of the melanosomes preserved in its feathers indicates that it may have had gray and iridescent plumage.
-Protornis (1844): Oligocene (Rupelian) Switzerland. A coraciiform known from a partial skeleton. Possibly a stem-motmot.
-Quasisyndactylus (1998): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. A coraciiform known from several specimens, including complete skeletons. Probably closely related to kingfishers.
-Rupelramphastoides (2005): Oligocene (Rupelian) Germany. A small pician known from partial skeletons.
-Septencoracias (2016): Eocene (Ypresian) Denmark and U.K. A coraciian known from a nearly complete skeleton. The oldest known coraciiform. Known to have eaten fish.
-Septentrogon (2002): Eocene (Ypresian) Denmark. The oldest known stem-trogon. Known from a braincase.
-Sylphornis (1988): Eocene (Bartonian) France. Possibly a stem-piciform or stem-galbulan.
-Ueekenkcoracias (2021): Eocene (Ypresian) Argentina. A possible coraciian known from a partial hindlimb, and potentially the first coraciian known from South America. However, it may have instead been a bird similar to Palaeopsittacus.

Cariamiforms
-Andalgalornis (1960): Miocene (Tortonian–Messinian) Argentina. A phorusrhacid known from several specimens, including a partial skeleton. May have attacked prey using vertical strikes of the beak.
-Andrewsornis (1941): Oligocene (Chattian) Argentina. A phorusrhacid known from several fragmentary specimens, including an incomplete skull.
-Bathornis (1927): Eocene–Oligocene (Priabonian–Chattian) U.S.A. A flightless cariamiform known from several specimens, including a partial skeleton. Four valid species have been named, B. veredus, B. cursor, B. fricki, and B. grallator. Includes "Neocathartes", "Palaeocrex", and "Palaeogyps".
-Ciconiopsis (1899): Oligocene (Chattian) Argentina. Known from a partial wing. Was described as a stork, but is more likely a phorusrhacid.
-Devincenzia (1932): Miocene–Pliocene (Tortonian–Zanclean) Argentina and Uruguay. A large phorusrhacid known from limb bones and a partial skull. Includes "Onactornis".
-Dynamopterus (1892): Eocene–Oligocene (Lutetian–Chattian) France and Germany. Known from many fossils. Had a well-developed first toe, unlike extant seriemas. Species living in forested environments appear to have been less cursorial. Eight species have been named, D. velox, D. anthracinus, D. gaillardi, D. gallicus, D. gracilis, D. itardiensis, D. minor, and D. tuberculatus. Includes "Idiornis".
-Eutreptornis (1971): Eocene (Lutetian) U.S.A. Known from hindlimb bones. Possibly closely related to Bathornis.
-Ibidopodia (1871): Miocene (Aquitanian) France. An idiornithid known from hindlimb bones. Three species have been named, I. palustris, I. chavrochensis, and I. minuta.
-Kelenken (2007): Miocene (Langhian) Argentina. The largest known phorusrhacid. Known from a nearly complete skull and some limb bones.
-Llallawavis (2015): Pliocene (Piacenzian) Argentina. The most completely known phorusrhacid.
-Mesembriornis (1889): Miocene–Pliocene (Tortonian–Piacenzian) Argentina. A phorusrhacid known from several specimens, including a nearly complete skeleton. Two species have been named, M. milneedwardsi and M. incertus. Includes "Hermosiornis".
-Miocariama (2017): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Argentina. Known from a partial skeleton. Closely related to extant seriemas.
-Oblitavis (1983): Eocene or Oligocene (exact age unknown) France. An idiornithid known from forelimb bones.
-Occitaniavis (1983): Eocene (Priabonian) France. An idiornithid known from limb bones.
-Paleopsilopterus (1985): Eocene (Ypresian) Brazil. Known from hindlimb bones. Possibly a phorusrhacid.
-Paraphysornis (1993): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Aquitanian) Brazil. A large phorusrhacid known from a nearly complete skeleton.
-Patagorhacos (2015): Miocene (Aquitanian–Burdigalian) Argentina. A phorusrhacid known from a skull fragment and a partial arm bone.
-Patagornis (1891): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Argentina. A phorusrhacid known from several specimens, including nearly complete skeletons. Includes "Tolmodus".
-Phorusrhacos (1887): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Argentina. A large phorusrhacid known from several specimens.
-Physornis (1895): Oligocene (Chattian) Argentina. A large phorusrhacid known from fragmentary remains.
-Procariama (1914): Miocene–Pliocene (Tortonian–Zanclean) Argentina. A small phorusrhacid known from several specimens, including a nearly complete skeleton.
-Propelargus (1891): Eocene or Oligocene (exact age unknown) France. An idiornithid known from hindlimb bones. Once thought to have been a stork, and remains of storks have been erroneously referred to it.
-Psilopterus (1891): Oligocene–Pleistocene (Chattian–Late Pleistocene) Argentina and Uruguay. A small phorusrhacid known from several specimens, including a nearly complete skeleton. Four valid species have been named, P. bachmanni, P. affinis, P. colzecus, and P. lemoinei. Includes "Pseudolarus".
-Talantatos (1852): Eocene (Priabonian) France. Known from a leg bone.
-Titanis (1963): Pliocene (Zanclean–Piacenzian) U.S.A. The only North American phorusrhacid.

Eufalconimorphs
-Aidemedia (1991): Pleistocene–Holocene (Late Pleistocene–Meghalayan) U.S.A. (Hawaii). A finch with a long bill, specialized for gaping. Three species have been named, A. lutetiae, A. chascax, and A. zanclops.
-Akialoa (1995): Holocene (Northgrippian–Meghalayan) U.S.A. (Hawaii). A long-billed finch that primarily fed on nectar. Five species have been named, A. obscura, A. ellisiana, A. lanaiensis, A. stejnegeri, and A. upupirostris.
-Antarctoboenus (2016): Eocene (Ypresian?) Antarctica. A falcon known from a partial foot.
-Archaeopsittacus (1933): Miocene (Aquitanian–Langhian) France. A parrot known from limb bones.
-Badiostes (1895): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Argentina. A falcon known from a partial foot. Once thought to have been an owl.
-Bavaripsitta (2004): Miocene (Langhian) Germany. A parrot known from limb bones.
-Certhiops (2008): Miocene (Burdigalian) Germany. A certhioid known from a foot.
-Chaetoptila (1869): Holocene (Meghalayan) U.S.A. (Hawaii). A mohoid with streaked plumage.
-Chloridops (1888): Pleistocene–Holocene (Chibanian–Meghalayan) U.S.A. (Hawaii). A finch with a very robust bill. Three species have been named, C. kona, C. regiskongi, and C. wahi.
-Ciridops (1892): Holocene (Northgrippian–Meghalayan) U.S.A. (Hawaii). A finch with powerful hindlimbs. Known to have been preyed on by Grallistrix. Two species have been named, C. anna and C. tenax.
-Conuropsis (1891): Holocene (Meghalayan) U.S.A. A highly gregarious, abundant parrot. Despite having survived into historical times, the causes of its extinction are poorly understood, though overhunting likely played a part.
-Corvitalusoides (2006): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Burdigalian) Australia. A large passeriform known from a partial leg bone.
-Cremaster (1959): Pleistocene (Chibanian) U.S.A. An arboreal icterid known from limb bones.
-Crosnoornis (2021): Oligocene (Rupelian) Poland. A suboscine known from a nearly complete skeleton with preserved feathers. Had a relatively stout bill and was likely mostly terrestrial.
-Cryptopsar (2014): Holocene? (exact age unknown) Mauritius. A starling with robust hindlimbs and a powerful bill.
-Cyrilavis (2010): Eocene (Ypresian) U.S.A. A halcyornithid known from several well-preserved specimens. Once thought to have been a species of Primobucco. Two species have been named, C. olsoni and C. colburnorum.
-Dendroscansor (1991): Pleistocene–Holocene? (Late Pleistocene–Greenlandian?) New Zealand. A possibly flightless acanthisittid with a long, curved bill.
-Dobrosturnus (2020): Miocene (Serravallian–Tortonian) Bulgaria. A starling known from a partial skeleton.
-Dysmorodrepanis (1919): Holocene (Meghalayan) U.S.A. (Hawaii). A finch with a hooked bill.
-Eofringillirostrum (2019): Eocene (Ypresian–Lutetian) Germany and U.S.A. A stem-passeriform with a finch-like beak. Two species have been named, E. boudreauxi and E. parvulum.
-Eozygodactylus (2010): Eocene (Ypresian) U.S.A. Possibly a species of Zygodactylus.
-Eremarida (2012): Miocene (Tortonian) Bulgaria. A lark known from a shoulder bone.
-Fregilupus (1831): Holocene (Meghalayan) Réunion. A hoopoe-like starling with a prominent feather crest on its head, a powerful beak, and large feet.
-Halcyornis (1846): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. A stem-psittacopasseran known from a partial skull. Likely had well-developed senses of sight, hearing, and smell.
-Henocitta (1959): Pleistocene (Chibanian) U.S.A. A corvid known from a partial arm bone.
-Heracles (2019): Miocene (Burdigalian) New Zealand. The largest known parrot.
-Heteralocha (1851): Holocene (Meghalayan) New Zealand. A large callaeid. Females had a longer, more curved beak than males, exhibiting sexual dimorphism in feeding strategies. Went extinct in historical times, likely due to overhunting and predation from invasive species.
-Jamna (2011): Oligocene (Rupelian) Poland. A passeriform known from a nearly complete skeleton. Likely foraged on the ground in forested environments.
-Khwenena (2013): Pliocene (Zanclean) South Africa. A parrot known from feet.
-Kischinskinia (2018): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Russia. A certhioid known from a partial foot.
-Kuiornis (2010): Miocene (Burdigalian) New Zealand. An acanthisittid known from limb bones.
-Kurrartapu (2013): Miocene (Aquitanian–Burdigalian) Australia. An artamid known from a partial foot.
-Lagopterus (1891): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) Argentina. A falcon known from an arm bone that has been lost. May have belonged to the extant genus Caracara.
-Longmornis (1999): Miocene (Aquitanian–Burdigalian) Australia. An oriole known from a jaw.
-Lophopsittacus (1875): Holocene (Meghalayan) Mauritius. A large, apparently weak-flying parrot with a large bill.
-Mascarinus (1830): Holocene (Meghalayan) Réunion. A parrot with a large red bill and a black facial mask.
-Masillaraptor (2006): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. A possible stem-falcon with small talons.
-Melamprosops (1974): Holocene (Meghalayan) U.S.A. (Hawaii). A finch with a slightly elongated bill that specialized in feeding on snails.
-Meridiocichla (2004): Pleistocene–Holocene? (Late Pleistocene–Greenlandian?) France and Greece. A large thrush known from a partial beak and limb bones.
-Messelastur (1994): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. A raptorial bird with semi-zygodactyl feet. Possibly a stem-parrot, but may have been some other type of eufalconimorph.
-Miocitta (1972): Miocene (Serravallian) U.S.A. A corvid known from a partial arm bone.
-Miocorvus (1933): Miocene (Langhian–Messinian) France, Hungary, and Romania. A corvid known from many specimens.
-Miopica (2004): Miocene (Messinian) Ukraine. A corvid known from a partial arm bone.
-Mogontiacopsitta (2010): Oligocene–Miocene (exact age unknown) Germany. A small parrot known from a partial foot.
-Moho (1830): Holocene (Meghalayan) U.S.A. (Hawaii). A nectarivorous songbird. Went extinct in historical times due to habitat loss, overhunting, predation from invasive species, and disease. Four species have been named, M. nobilis, M. apicalis, M. bishopi, and M. braccatus.
-Morsoravis (2010): Eocene (Ypresian) Denmark. Known from a well-preserved partial skeleton. Was described as a possible charadriiform, but is more likely a stem-passeriform.
-Namapsitta (2015): Eocene? (Bartonian?) Namibia. A possible stem-parrot known from limb bones.
-Necropsar (1879): Holocene (Meghalayan) Rodrigues. A starling with a powerful beak. Allegedly ate seabird eggs and turtle carcasses.
-Necropsittacus (1874): Holocene (Meghalayan) Rodrigues. A large green parrot.
-Nelepsittacus (2011): Miocene (Burdigalian) New Zealand. Closely related to nestorine parrots. Three species have been named, N. minimus, N. daphneleeae, and N. donmertoni.
-Orthiospiza (1991): Holocene? (exact age unknown) U.S.A. (Hawaii). A large, mountain-dwelling finch.
-Pachyplichas (1988): Pleistocene–Holocene? (Late Pleistocene–Meghalayan?) New Zealand. A possibly flightless acanthisittid with robust hindlimbs. Known to have been preyed on by the laughing owl. Two species have been named, P. yaldwyni and P. jagmi.
-Palaeoscinis (1957): Miocene (Serravallian–Tortonian) U.S.A. A songbird known from a nearly complete skeleton, mostly preserved as an impression.
-Pampaemberiza (2007): Pleistocene (Chibanian) Argentina. A possible passerellid known from a partial beak.
-Pandanaris (1947): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) Mexico and U.S.A. A wide-ranging cowbird.
-Parapsittacopes (2021): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. A stem-passeriform known from a partial skeleton. May have caught insects by making short flights from a perch.
-Pararallus (1933): Miocene (Langhian) France. Initially thought to have been a rail, but was more likely a parrot. Some bones formerly referred to it have been reassigned to Palaeoaramides.
-Pedinorhis (1981): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) Puerto Rico. A possible passerellid with a broad, flattened beak.
-Pediohierax (1987): Miocene (Burdigalian–Serravallian) U.S.A. A small falcon known from limb bones.
-Petrosushkinia (2015): Miocene (Tortonian–Messinian) Kazakhstan. A falcon known from limb bones. Was initially named "Sushkinia", but that name had already been used for a dragonfly-like insect.
-Praealauda (2012): Miocene (Serravallian–Tortonian) Hungary. A lark known from a partial leg bone.
-Primoscens (1977): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. A zygodactylid known from a partial wing.
-Primozygodactylus (1998): Eocene (Ypresian–Lutetian) Germany and U.K. A zygodactylid known from numerous specimens. Had a pair of long tail feathers at the center of its tail fan. Known to have eaten seeds. Six species have been named, P. danielsi, P. ballmanni, P. eunjooae, P. longibrachium, P. major, and P. quintus.
-Pseudasturides (2004): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. A halcyornithid known from several specimens, including complete skeletons. Was initially named "Pseudastur", but that name had already been used for a hawk.
-Pseudoseisuropsis (1991): Pleistocene (Gelasian–Late Pleistocene) Argentina and Uruguay. A large ovenbird. Three species have been named, P. nehuen, P. cuelloi, and P. wintu.
-Psittacopes (1998): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. A small bird with a fairly short, robust beak. Has been considered a stem-parrot, but may have actually been a stem-passeriform.
-Pulchrapollia (2000): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. A halcyornithid known from a partial skeleton.
-Pumiliornis (1999): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. A stem-passeriform known from several specimens, including complete skeletons. Has been found with pollen as gut contents, suggesting that it was nectarivorous.
-Pyelorhamphus (1932): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene?) U.S.A. A thick-billed icterid.
-Quercypsitta (1992): Eocene (Priabonian) France. A stem-parrot known from limb bones. Two species have been named, Q. sudrei and Q. ivani.
-Resoviaornis (2013): Oligocene (Rupelian) Poland. A passeriform known from a nearly complete skeleton.
-Rhodacanthis (1892): Pleistocene–Holocene (Chibanian–Meghalayan) U.S.A. (Hawaii). A finch that used its strong beak to slice open seed pods. Four species have been named, R. palmeri, R. flaviceps, R. forfex, and R. litotes.
-Serudaptus (2000): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. A halcyornithid known from a complete specimen.
-Stintonornis (1984): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. Known from a partial foot. Possibly a falcon.
-Sylvosimadaravis (2017): Miocene (Tortonian) Hungary. A sylviidan known from a partial shoulder bone.
-Thegornis (1895): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Argentina. A falcon known from several specimens, including a nearly complete skeleton. Closely related to the laughing falcon. Two species have been named, T. musculosus and T. debilis. Includes "Noriegavis".
-Traversia (1894): Pleistocene–Holocene (Late Pleistocene–Meghalayan) New Zealand. A flightless acanthisittid. Went extinct in historical times due to predation from feral cats.
-Turdicus (1962): Miocene–Pleistocene (Serravallian–Calabrian) Hungary and Romania. A thrush known from limb bones. Three species have been named, T. tenuis, T. minor, and T. pannonicus.
-Turnagra (1837): Holocene (Meghalayan) New Zealand. A ground-dwelling oriole. Went extinct in historical times due to habitat loss and predation from invasive species. Two species have been named, T. capensis and T. tanagra.
-Tynskya (2000): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. and U.S.A. Known from partial skeletons. Probably closely related to Messelastur. Two species have been named, T. eocaena and T. waltonensis.
-Vangulifer (1991): Holocene (Northgrippian?) U.S.A. (Hawaii). A finch with an unusual, broad bill. Two species have been named, V. mirandus and V. neophasis.
-Viridonia (1892): Holocene (Meghalayan) U.S.A. (Hawaii). A reclusive, insectivorous finch.
-Wieslochia (2006): Oligocene (Rupelian) Germany. A passeriform known from a partial skeleton and a skull.
-Winnicavis (2018): Oligocene (Rupelian) Poland. A passeriform known from partial wings.
-Xenopsitta (1998): Miocene (Burdigalian) Czech Republic. A parrot known from limb bones.
-Xestospiza (1991): Pleistocene–Holocene (Chibanian–Northgrippian) U.S.A. (Hawaii). A finch with a cone-shaped bill. Two species have been named, X. fastigialis and X. conica.
-Yunnanus (1985): Miocene (Messinian) China. A passeriform known from limb bones.
-Zygodactylus (1969): Eocene–Miocene (Ypresian–Serravallian) France, Germany, and U.S.A. Long known only from feet, though complete specimens have since been discovered. Once thought to have been a piciform, but now considered a stem-passeriform. Five species have been named, Z. ignotus, Z. grandei, Z. grivensis, Z. luberonensis, and Z. ochlurus.

Indeterminate/Miscellaneous Avialans
-Aminornis (1899): Oligocene (Chattian) Argentina. Known only from a partial shoulder bone.
-Anisolornis (1891): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Argentina. Known only from a partial foot.
-Anserpica (2004): Oligocene (Chattian) France. Known only from a shoulder bone. Possibly a stem-magpie-goose, but also had similarities to gruiforms.
-Ardeacites (1855): Miocene–Pliocene (Messinian–Zanclean) Germany. Known only from an arm bone that has been lost.
-Asiavis (1986): Eocene (Bartonian) Uzbekistan. Known from a partial wing bone. Was described as a gruiform, but may have actually been an anseriform or pelagornithid.
-Australornis (2014): Paleocene (Selandian) New Zealand. A marine neognath of uncertain affinities.
-Avolatavis (2012): Eocene (Ypresian) U.S.A. A telluravian known from a partial skeleton. Possibly a stem-parrot.
-Barawertornis (1979): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Burdigalian) Australia. The smallest known dromornithid.
-Brontornis (1891): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Argentina. A very large bird known from hindlimb bones, vertebrae, and a partial jaw. May have been either a cariamiform or an anseriform. Includes "Liornis" and "Stephanornis".
-Calcardea (1987): Paleocene–Eocene (Thanetian–Ypresian) U.S.A. Known from a partial skeleton. Once thought to have been a heron, but was more likely a telluravian.
-Callornis (1895): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Argentina. Known only from a partial leg bone. Possibly the same as Brontornis.
-Carpathiavis (2019): Oligocene (Rupelian) Poland. A small bird of uncertain affinities, known from a nearly complete skeleton.
-Caspiodontornis (1982): Oligocene (Rupelian–Chattian) Azerbaijan. A pelagornithid known from a skull. Possibly the same as Guguschia.
-Cladornis (1895): Oligocene (Chattian) Argentina. Known from a distinctive foot bone, but cannot be confidently assigned to any specific bird group.
-Climacarthrus (1899): Oligocene (Chattian) Argentina. Known only from a partial leg bone. May have been an accipitriform.
-Coturnipes (1977): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. Known only from a partial foot. Was described as a galliform, but also had similarities to messelornithids.
-Cruschedula (1899): Oligocene (Chattian) Argentina. Known only from a partial shoulder bone. May have been an accipitriform.
-Cyphornis (1894): Exact age unknown, Canada. A pelagornithid known only from a partial foot.
-Dakotornis (1975): Paleocene (Selandian–Thanetian) U.S.A. Known only from fragmentary remains.
-Dasornis (1870): Paleocene–Eocene (Thanetian–Ypresian) Kazakhstan, Morocco, and U.K. A pelagornithid that ranged from gannet-sized to larger than a wandering albatross. Three species have been named, D. emuinus, D. abdoun, and D. toliapica. Includes "Argillornis", "Macrodontopteryx", "Neptuniavis", and "Odontopteryx".
-Dromornis (1872): Oligocene–Pliocene (Chattian–Piacenzian) Australia. A large dromornithid and one of the largest known avialans. Males were more robust but not much taller than females. Four species have been named, D. australis, D. murrayi, D. planei, and D. stirtoni. Includes "Bullockornis".
-Elaphrocnemus (1892): Eocene–Oligocene (Priabonian–Chattian) France. Known from numerous specimens. Had some similarities to seriemas, but also others to hoatzins. Three species have been named, E. phasianus, E. brodkorbi, and E. crex. Includes "Filholornis".
-Eleutherornis (1940): Eocene (Lutetian) France and Switzerland. A large bird known from limb bones and a partial hip bone. Possibly a phorusrhracid.
-Elornis (1868): Eocene–Oligocene (Priabonian–Rupelian) France and U.K. Known only from fragmentary remains. Once thought to have been a flamingo, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Empheresula (1975): Oligocene (Chattian) France. Known from a partial hip and breastbone. Possibly a booby.
-Eobalearica (1949): Eocene (exact age unknown) Kyrgyzstan. Known from a partial leg bone. Once thought to have been a crane, but may have actually been a pelagornithid.
-Eoceornis (1915): Eocene (Ypresian–Lutetian) U.S.A. Known only from a partial breastbone.
-Eociconia (1989): Eocene (exact age unknown) China. Known only from a partial foot. Possibly a stork.
-Eocolius (2001): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. Known from a partial skeleton. Was described as a mousebird, but this has been disputed.
-Eocuculus (1999): Eocene–Oligocene (Priabonian–Rupelian) France and U.S.A. Known from partial skeletons. Has been suggested to have been a stem-cuckoo, but may have been a stem-passeriform.
-Eonessa (1938): Eocene (Lutetian) U.S.A. Known from forelimb bones. Was described as an anatid, but this has been disputed.
-Eopachypteryx (2015): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. An arboreal bird of uncertain affinities. Had a stout beak and short hindlimbs.
-Eopteryx (1887): Eocene (Priabonian) U.S.A. Known only from a partial vertebra.
-Eremopezus (1904): Oligocene (Rupelian) Egypt. A large, ground-dwelling bird known only from hindlimb bones. Possibly a paleognath.
-Eupterornis (1878): Paleocene (Thanetian) France. Known only from fragmentary forelimb bones.
-Eurofluvioviridavis (2005): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. Once thought to have been closely related to Fluvioviridavis, but may have actually been a telluravian.
-Eutreptodactylus (1997): Eocene (Ypresian) Brazil. Known only from a foot that has been lost. Was described as a cuckoo, but this has been disputed. Possibly closely related to Gracilitarsus.
-Fissuravis (2007): Paleocene (Selandian) Germany. Known only from a partial shoulder bone. Possibly a lithornithid.
-Fluviatilavis (1983): Eocene (Ypresian) Portugal. Known only from a leg bone. Was described as a charadriiform, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Foshanornis (2015): Eocene (exact age unknown) China. Known from a partial skeleton. Had some similarities to trogons, including a foot in which the first and second toes point backward.
-Gastornis (1855): Paleocene–Eocene (Selandian–Lutetian) Belgium, Canada, China, France, Germany, U.K., and U.S.A. A large, flightless galloanseran with a robust skull. Once considered a probable carnivore, but was more likely herbivorous. Seven valid species have been named, G. parisiensis, G. geiselensis, G. giganteus, G. laurenti, G. russelli, G. sarasini, and G. xichuanensis. Includes "Diatryma", "Omorhamphus", and "Zhongyuanus".
-Genyornis (1896): Pleistocene (Late Pleistocene) Australia. The youngest known dromornithid. Had a more goose-like beak compared to larger dromornithids. Many eggshells formerly attributed to it may actually belong to extinct megapodes.
-Gigantibis (1976): Eocene (Priabonian) U.K. Known only from a leg bone. Was described as an ibis, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed. May have actually been the same as Agnopterus.
-Gigantornis (1916): Eocene (Bartonian) Nigeria. A pelagornithid known only from a partial breastbone.
-Gnotornis (1942): Oligocene (Rupelian) U.S.A. Known from a partial arm bone. Possibly a heron.
-Gradiornis (2007): Paleocene (Selandian) Germany. Probably a terrestrial, weak-flying bird. Had some similarities to cariamiforms.
-Guguschia (1968): Oligocene (Chattian) Azerbaijan. Was described as a swan, but is more likely a pelagornithid.
-Gypsornis (1869): Eocene (Priabonian) France. Known from a partial foot. Has been considered a cariamiform, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Hoazinavis (2011): Oligocene–Miocene (Chattian–Aquitanian) Brazil. A stem-hoatzin known from forelimb bones. The smallest known stem-hoatzin.
-Hoazinoides (1953): Miocene (Serravallian) Colombia. A stem-hoatzin known from a skull fragment and limb bones.
-Hydrotherikornis (1931): Eocene (Priabonian) U.S.A. Known from a leg bone. May have been either an auk or a procellariiform.
-Ilbandornis (1979): Miocene (Tortonian–Messinian) Australia. A fairly long-legged, probably fast-running dromornithid. Two species have been named, I. woodburnei and I. lawsoni.
-Itaboravis (2011): Eocene (Ypresian) Brazil. Known from limb bones. Similar to Elaphrocnemus.
-Kashinia (1979): Eocene (Priabonian) U.K. Known only from a shoulder bone. Was initially named "Tenuicrus", but that name had already been used for a mite. Has been suggested to have been a mirandornithean, though this has been disputed.
-Laornis (1870): Late Cretaceous?–Paleocene (Maastrichtian?–Danian) U.S.A. Known from a partial leg bone.
-Lapillavis (2016): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. A possible telluravian known from a partial skeleton. The earliest known Cenozoic bird found preserved with medullary bone. Known to have eaten fish and seeds.
-Lavocatavis (2011): Eocene (Ypresian–Lutetian) Algeria. Known only from a leg bone. Possibly a phorusrhacid.
-Lophiornis (1891): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Argentina. Known only from a partial leg bone. Possibly a phorusrhacid.
-Lutetodontopteryx (2012): Eocene (Lutetian) Ukraine. A relatively small (albatross-sized) pelagornithid.
-Manu (1946): Oligocene (Chattian) New Zealand. Known only from a wishbone and a partial leg bone. Possibly a pelagornithid.
-Marinavis (1977): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. Known from a partial beak and wing bone. Was described as a procellariiform, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Microena (1977): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. Only known from a foot. Was described as a pigeon, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Minggangia (1982): Eocene (Priabonian) China. Known from partial limb bones. Was described as an ibis, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed. May have been a gruiform.
-Miodytes (2002): Miocene (Burdigalian) Serbia. Known from forelimb bones. Was described as a grebe, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Namibiavis (2003): Miocene (Burdigalian–Langhian) Kenya and Namibia. A stem-hoatzin known from limb bones.
-Novacaesareala (2002): Late Cretaceous?–Paleocene (Maastrichtian?–Danian) U.S.A. Known from partial forelimb bones. Had some similarities to stem-tropicbirds.
-Oligocathartes (1979): Oligocene (Rupelian) U.K. Known only from a partial foot. Was described as a cathartid, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Onychopteryx (1971): Eocene (exact age unknown) Argentina. Known only from a partial foot. Has been suggested to have been a stem-hoatzin, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Palaeopsittacus (1982): Eocene (Ypresian–Lutetian) Germany and U.K. Was described as a parrot, but this is now considered unlikely. Had some similarities to Fluvioviridavis.
-Palaeotringa (1870): Late Cretaceous?–Paleocene (Maastrichtian?–Danian) U.S.A. Known from partial limb bones. Two species have been named, P. littoralis and P. vagans.
-Paracrax (1964): Oligocene (Rupelian) U.S.A. A large bird known from several specimens, including a partial skeleton. Has been considered a close relative of Bathornis, but this has been disputed. Three species have been named, P. antiqua, P. gigantea, and P. wetmorei.
-Parvicuculus (1977): Eocene (Ypresian) France, U.K., and U.S.A. Known only from feet. Was described as a cuckoo, but this has been disputed. May have been closely related to Fluvioviridavis.
-Parvigyps (1977): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. Known only from a partial arm bone and hip bones. Was described as an accipitrid, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Parvulivenator (1982): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. A small bird known from feet. Was described as a falcon, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Pelagornis (1857): Oligocene–Pliocene (Chattian–Piacenzian) Australia, Chile, France, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Portugal, U.S.A., and Venezuela. A wide-ranging pelagornithid with the largest known wingspan of any bird. Nine valid species have been named, P. miocaenus, P. chilensis, P. longirostris, P. mauretanicus, P. mioceanus, P. orri, P. sandersi, P. stirtoni, and P. wetmorei. Includes "Neodontornis", "Osteodontornis", "Palaeochenoides", "Pseudodontornis", and "Tympanonesiotes".
-Perplexicervix (2010): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. A long-winged, short-beaked bird of uncertain affinities. Had unusual bumps on its neck vertebrae.
-Pliogrus (1933): Miocene (Tortonian) Germany. Known only from a partial leg bone. Was thought to have been a crane, but may have been the same as Palaelodus.
-Precursor (1977): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. Known only from partial arm and foot bones. Was described as a charadriiform, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Primodroma (1977): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. Known only from a partial arm bone. Was described as a procellariiform, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Proceriavis (1979): Oligocene (Rupelian) U.K. Known only from fragmentary remains. Possibly a paleognath.
-Proherodius (1891): Eocene (Ypresian) U.K. Known only from a partial breastbone. Possibly a presbyornithid.
-Prophalacrocorax (1975): Oligocene (Rupelian) France. Known only from a partial hip. Once thought to have been a duck or a booby. Has been considered a cormorant, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Protoazin (2014): Eocene (Priabonian) France. The oldest known definite stem-hoatzin.
-Protodontopteryx (2019): Paleocene (Danian) New Zealand. The oldest and smallest known pelagornithid. Was less specialized for soaring than later pelagornithids.
-Protopelicanus (1852): Eocene (Priabonian) France. Known only from a leg bone. Possibly a pelican.
-Qianshanornis (2013): Paleocene (Selandian) China. Known from a partial skeleton. Had some similarities to Strigogyps.
-Qinornis (1995): Paleocene (Danian–Selandian) China. Known from hindlimb bones. Has been suggested to have been a non-neornithean avialan, but this has been disputed.
-Riacama (1899): Oligocene (Chattian) Argentina. Known only from a partial shoulder bone. Has been suggested to have been a cariamiform, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Salmila (2000): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. A possible stem-seriema known from several specimens, including complete skeletons.
-Sanshuiornis (2012): Eocene (exact age unknown) China. Known from a partial hindlimb. Had some similarities to ibises.
-Scaniornis (1890): Paleocene (Danian) Sweden. Known only from fragmentary remains. Possibly some kind of aquatic bird.
-Smiliornis (1899): Oligocene (Chattian) Argentina. Known only from a partial shoulder bone. Possibly a cariamiform. May have been the same as Psilopterus.
-Strigogyps (1908): Eocene–Oligocene? (Lutetian–Chattian?) France and Germany. A possibly flightless bird. Had some similarities to seriemas. Known to have eaten plants. Three species have been named, S. dubius, S. robustus, and S. sapea. Includes "Aenigmavis", "Ameghinornis", "Eocathartes", and "Geiseloceros".
-Teracus (1871): Oligocene (Rupelian) France. Known from a leg and shoulder bone. Thought to have been a cathartid, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Tiliornis (1899): Oligocene (Chattian) Argentina. Known only from a shoulder bone that has been lost.
-Tytthostonyx (1987): Late Cretaceous?–Paleocene (Maastrichtian?–Danian) U.S.A. Known from a partial arm bone. Had some similarities to procellariiforms.
-Vanolimicola (2017): Eocene (Lutetian) Germany. A small bird with similarities to both jacanas and ralloids.
-Vastanavis (2007): Eocene (Ypresian) India. A telluravian known from numerous specimens (consisting of limb bones). Possibly a stem-parrot. Two species have been named, V. eocaena and V. cambayensis.
-Venerator (1969): Oligocene (Rupelian) Mongolia. Known only from an arm bone. Possibly an accipitriform. Was initially named "Tutor", but that name had already been used for a lizard.
-Villetus (1976): Eocene (Bartonian) U.K. Known only from partial leg bones. Was described as a charadriiform, but the material is too fragmentary for this to be confirmed.
-Walbeckornis (2007): Paleocene (Selandian) Germany. Known from many specimens. Possibly closely related to messelornithids.
-Wanshuina (1994): Paleocene (Selandian) China. Known from limb bones. Possibly closely related to Walbeckornis.
-Yalavis (1913): Eocene (Priabonian) U.S.A. A small bird known from feet and some feathers.
-Zheroia (1988): Eocene (Lutetian–Bartonian) Uzbekistan. Known only from a partial leg bone. Possibly a pelagornithid.

27 comments:

  1. Do you know of any good sources for extinct species belonging to extant genera? Brodkorb's Catalogue of Fossil Birds is really nice but it's also very out of date unfortunately.

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    1. Unfortunately, I don't think there's currently any kind of centralized, publicly available source. Fred Ruhe has a rather thorough personal list that he is willing to share, but it is not meant for publication.

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    2. Thanks for your reply! It is indeed unfortunate that there isn't currently a public resource for this. I'd be interested in Fred's list if he'd be willing to send it to me, I'll ask him for it.

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  2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  3. You forgot the Asian ratite Hypselornis.

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    1. Hypselornis has been reinterpreted as a crocodylian, per Lowe (1929).

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  4. You forgot Palaeotringa (whatever it is).

    Eutreptodactylus is a gracilitarsid according to Mayr.

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    1. Re Palaeotringa: NVM, I didn’t notice it was on your Mesozoic list.

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    2. Mayr did refer Eutreptodactylus to Gracilitarsidae in his 2005 paper on Gracilitarsus. His more recent mentions of it, however, come across as treating this assignment more tentatively. In Paleogene Fossil Birds, he only says that Eutreptodactylus is morphologically similar to Gracilitarsus without directly calling it a gracilitarsid, and lists it separately from Gracilitarsidae in the tables in the appendix. In Mayr et al. (2011), Eutreptodactylus is said to be of uncertain phylogenetic affinities without further comment.
      It is true though that he never actually retracted his suggestion of gracilitarsid affinities (and it does appear to be plausible), so I will mention it in the text.

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  5. Minggangia is a gruiform (Stidham et al., 2005).

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    1. They say that it has features "consistent with" gruiform affinities. I'll mention that in the text, but won't move it for now.

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  6. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  8. Wow, I can't find a single missing bird in this list.

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  9. Olson (1985) suggested that Paractiornis is a synonym of Glareola, but I don’t know if anyone else has followed this.

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    1. De Pietri et al. (2020) noted that "It is [...] not possible [...] to ally Paractiornis perpusillus with any extant glareolid lineage in the absence of additional skeletal material", so it's probably safe to say that it's not currently followed.

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  10. Eurofluvioviridavis is a psittacopasserine according to Mayr’s book.

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    1. That is based on his 2015 paper, in which he found it to clade with Avolatavis and Vastanavis. However, that clade was not recovered in Psittacopasserae when Eufalconimorphae was constrained to be monophyletic. A similar result was found by Mayr (2021) using an updated version of the same dataset.

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  11. Have Salmila, Strigogyps & Qianshanornis ever been suggested to not be cariamiforms?

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    1. Qianshanornis was never really considered one. The original description noted some similarities to Strigogyps, but concluded that a close relationship between the two was "not strongly supported". The authors further commented, "The bones of Qianshanornis show little similarity to those of the Cariamae and we certainly do not advocate affinities to any of the 'gruiform' taxa."

      As for Strigogyps itself, the same paper says, "Strigogyps is currently assigned to the Cariamae, but this classification is largely based on overall similarity" and "The incompletely known osteology of Strigogyps does not permit a comprehensive character analysis, and some of the Strigogyps species were initially likened to 'falconiform' and strigiform birds". Mayr (2005) considered its phylogenetic affinities to modern birds uncertain.

      Most of the phylogenetic analyses that have included Salmila were done under the assumption that cariamiforms were gruiforms, so their results need to be taken with a grain of salt. In his descriptions of Salmila, Mayr observed similarities to trumpeters, and he considered its affinities "not yet [...] convincingly established" in Paleogene Fossil Birds. Notably, Mayr did not list Strigogyps and Salmila as cariamiforms in his 2017 review paper on the Messel avifauna, despite doing so for Dynamopterus. Musser and Clarke (2020) recovered Salmila in a couple different alternative positions depending on the molecular topology they followed, but never as a stem-seriema (though their sampling of telluravians is quite limited, so I wouldn't read too much into that).

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  12. Mayr says that Fulicaletornis resembles Salmila. I don’t know how significant that is.

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  13. Where’s the telluravian Neanis?

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    1. Probably a nomen dubium. (Yes, I'm aware that I left some dubious taxa in the Mesozoic list. I haven't gotten around to cleaning them up.)

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  15. I can’t find any references to Petrosushkinia in the literature — did you mean Psushkinia?

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    1. "Psushkinia" was the name used Zelenkov's PhD thesis and an early draft of Zelenkov and Kurochkin (2015), which made its way online. In the final, printed version of Zelenkov and Kurochkin (2015), however, the name is given as Petrosushkinia.

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